This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Built around pivotal character Tinker Bell – arguably the most famous fairy in the world – Disney Fairies has grown quickly since its launch in 2005. Already a £50 million franchise in the UK, the fairies will be continuing to


sprinkle their pixie-dust throughout 2013 and beyond.


AWorld of Pixie-Dust


S


et in a world full of adventure, friendship and nature, the Disney Fairies franchise allows girls to


make the transition from fantasy-based childhood favourites to more reality-based characters, especially important as they start to develop their own identity but still want to relate to individual characters. The Disney Fairies franchise first started as a collection of storybooks, and introduces many new fairy characters, talents and worlds to explore. “With a continual flow of new long and short form content, Disney Fairies


continues to be a top priority for The Walt Disney Company,” said Justine Finch, franchise business director. “In 2011 we conducted some indepth research to understand how best we could grow the franchise. From a lifecycle perspective, it’s still in its infancy, even though Tinker Bell has an incredible heritage.” The research gave us


some fascinating insights. As a franchise, Disney Fairies was the perfect vehicle to


Fairy Favourites


appeal to girls aged between six and nine. “This slightly older age group are


Each of the six core Fairies has their own look, style, personality and special talent. The protagonist, Tinker Bell is the best-known of the group, and is headstrong, fun and brave. Her closest friends, Silvermist, Vidia, Iridessa, Rosetta, Fawn and Periwinkle all have their own individual backstories, which are continually developed through new content and digital platforms


better placed to really immerse themselves in the fairies’ world,” explained Justine. Younger girls will, of


A special max publishing


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disney publication 2013 ©Disney


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