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A harrods extravaganza


Right: The Disney Café by Harrods marks the first time a restaurant of this type has opened outside of Disney’s theme parks.


Feast For The Eyes


Providing a feast for the eyes as well as the tastebuds, is the Disney Café by Harrods, located close to the Disney Boutique. Making this treat for junior gourmands all the more significant, the cafe is the first Disney restaurant to open outside of its theme parks. The 100-seat family-friendly café offers both adult and children’s menus (devised by Harrods executive chef Duccio Orlandini in collaboration with Disney) – where else would you find a Mickey Mouse-shaped toastie! With storytelling at the heart of Disney, the


restaurant’s Big Ben centrepiece chimes twice each hour signalling time for a countdown to a classic Disney story.


wear Disney Princess dresses and pose in front of magical Disney backdrops. Adding to this ‘out of the ordinary’


retail theatre, is an eye-catching Cinderella statue and Slipper Salon in which a little girl’s dream can come true with the chance to own a pair of limited edition, glitter embellished slippers. While the Disney Pop-Up Boutique and Disney Café (see above) engage with the younger Disney fans, the ambitious plan for the Harrods windows (see right and inset) provided a fantastic way of appealing to more “grown up princesses.” As Nicola Duhig, who was the project manager on the multi-faceted retail execution so eloquently


Inset: Missoni celebrated the exotic colours of the Orient with the outfit created for ‘Mulan’. Top right: ‘Tiana’ looked stunning in her Ralph and Russo gown. Right: The Snow White dress created by Oscar de la Renta, made for a stunning window display in Harrods.


describes it: “Creating all this with Harrods is a ‘once upon a time retail fairytale that came true!”


Harrods is world-famous for its super glamorous window displays, but it really pulled out the stops recently with the crowd-puller fairytale settings and gowns created by leading couture names, in tribute to the ten Disney Princesses. * Ariel (from The Little Mermaid) was dressed by Marchesa in an elegant deep blue silk evening gown capturing her adventurous under the sea spirit. * Aurora (from Sleeping Beauty) was dressed by Elie Saab in a graceful pale pink gown embellished with scattered beading. * Belle (from Beauty and the Beast) was dressed by Valentino in silk chiffon with a sheer hooded cape and layers of exquisite pleats. * Cinderella was dressed by Versace in a stunning ballgown with golden layers – and of course glass slippers! * Jasmin (from Aladdin) was dressed by Escada in exotic fuschia silk chiffon and an extravagant golden floral belt. * Mulan was dressed by Missoni in a dazzling Oriental-style kimono. * Pocohontas was dressed by Roberto Cavalli in a printed gown that is evocative of dreamcatchers. * Rapunzel (from Tangled) was dressed by Jenny Packham in a magical dress of pale purple with incredible beading. * Snow White was dressed by Oscar de la Renta in a divine silk gown with intricately embroidered bodice and floor sweeping red cape. * Tiana (from The Princess and the Frog) was dressed by Ralph and Russo in a ‘dream come true’ mint evening gown with a tulle skirt that is scattered with crystals.


A SPECIAL MAX PUBLISHING 139


disney PUBLICATION 2013


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