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Marketing Matters Marketing At Retail


Operating as an integrated organisation means Disney can pull product and marketing campaigns together using assets and activity across the whole of the walt disney company – which is vital for Dan Dossa, head of retail marketing. “Our job is to ensure that when consumer interest is high in a particular franchise or property we have the product and promotional presence at retail to complete that consumer's shopping journey.” So when Anna and her team launch a new initiative, Dan


will coordinate retail executions to take advantage of the resulting spike in consumer interest and spend. This also works within the closer retail environment; so when promoting franchise activity Dan will leverage the interest in one product area to drive sales in related categories by connecting Disney's various product categories. “For example, during the week we launched the Avengers DVD in September 2012 we


Above: Dan Dossa, head of retail marketing.


increased Avengers toy product sales by 600% through our retail marketing activity” he pointed out. “Because we operate in so many businesses and across so many product categories, there are always consumer interest spikes on one franchise or another throughout the year.” Next year will see the release of 13 significant Disney movies. “We also have stronger TV


content and growing viewership of this content, particularly in the preschool area, more franchise content across our core franchises like Princess, Cars and Marvel and more opportunities across the entire business to link to retail,” said Dan. “Our 2013 retail activation calendar is full of key dates.” And even if there is no clear content spike for an ongoing franchise, retail marketing


programmes will be created around other initiatives. “It's vital that we co-ordinate all the activity across each franchise, to ensure that we take advantage of all the great opportunities to convert consumer interest into sales,” explained Dan. “Ultimately, each part of The Walt Disney Company needs to be speaking with one voice if we are to maximise each opportunity to broaden appeal and drive sales.”


“Everything we do is about continuing to grow our brand in the UK, ensuring that mums trust us and kids want us. We are doing some very different thinking which should really help us to grow our business. We want to work differently, be innovative and quick to market with solutions that work for both mums and children.” Anna Hill, chief marketing officer, EMEA.


Creating desire in the marketplace is a fundamental part of the marketing business, and Anna cannot overstate the importance of consumer insights in this. “Disney commits to a huge amount of research,” she explained, “so we know exactly what our consumers want and what is relevant to their lives. When we are investing money into looking for further opportunities for our franchises we have to make sure we are creating content that will really connect with our consumers.” The focus is on family – and mums in


particular. “They're the heart of the family,” said Anna. “By understanding mums' needs and the occasions in a family’s life we can make sure that we have products and solutions that work for them.” “We aim to create strong relationships and


drive our brand. Entertainment and emotional connection are both key, and this is something we are in a great place to leverage.”


To make this connection, it's important


that people are confident and comfortable with the Disney brand, and Anna readily acknowledges that Disney has the advantage of being a trusted brand. “We're very fortunate. We know that families see Disney as a ‘treat’, so we are keen to bring that treat into the family home on a more regular basis, in a way that will entertain the family and support mum. This may be through encouraging healthy lifestyles and being active as a family and


spending quality time together, or working with the family routines,


A SPECIAL MAX PUBLISHING © Disney 115 disney PUBLICATION 2013


for example bedtime reading and providing entertainment on car journeys.” One of the standout areas that Anna and


her team has identified is party. Research has shown that 75% of parents have two or more children, and that there are in the region of 10 million kids' birthday parties a year, making this area 'one of the more obvious solutions'. “We already have a good business in


party, but we can always do more. Parties are stressful and we should be the number one brand that any parent can rely on to give their child the perfect party. We can provide more product across more properties, ideas for themes, gifts, venues, invites – it's a huge opportunity.” “Ultimately, we are planning to extend


our range of product at retail, so we will be able to create spaces in stores that really showcase what a Disney party can look like. We want to help the consumer bring the magic into their own home.” Creating magical events and experiences outside the home is important to Disney and there have been some incredible opportunities over the last 12 months, such as “live shows (whether on ice or on stage), park attractions (as in the Jubilee celebrations in Hyde Park) and instore retail experiences. We are working with some great partners to achieve the latter, including Harrods.” Disney has a portfolio of properties which resonate with all ages and across both genders. It also has the ability – through content, marketing and retail programmes – to ensure that, as a company, it remains front of mind for everyone.


Below: Disney is looking to provide magical experiences in the UK, allowing families to find Disney entertainment close to home.


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