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Osteopathy HEALTH


Retirement can bring time for leisure, travel opportunities and interests to the older person.


This is the chance to take up those sports and activities that you never had time for whilst working and bringing up your family, e.g. golf, gardening, badminton, fitness classes etc.


C o m m o n problems The body, however, has changed. It has lost some of its elasticity and ability to adapt. It has also experienced injuries and postural stress during those years, often resulting in repetitive strain injuries, stiffness and degenerative changes.


The onset of health issues such as high blood pressure, digestive and circulatory disorders and arthritis have all begun to have a noticeable effect on the body’s energy and ability to perform.


Many grandparents also help working parents by caring for their grandchildren – a pleasure for many but also a strain on the older body.


Quality of life is especially important for this age group when


18 January 2013


as you get older


there are increasing concerns about loss of independence and mobility.


What do osteopaths do?


The body can be likened to a car, in that it needs regular service and maintenance as it gets older! Osteopathy can


help


greatly during this time. An os teo pat h will take a full case history so they can understand


how the body has been


affected so far. Then, after a full examination and assessment the osteopath will be able to offer treatment and advice to help release strains and stresses that have accumulated in the body over the years, improve mobility, circulation and immune function, and reduce joint stiffness so that the older person can enjoy a full and active life in retirement.


How many treatments are needed? Sometimes only a few treatments are needed, other people benefit from regular treatment, or an occasional “service” every few months to keep everything


working. Patients are seldom disappointed with the results and are frequently happy at being able to resume a more active lifestyle.


The treatment is usually gentle, involving gentle stretching and articulating joints and mu scle s, and aims to maintain health and prevent further injury.


A few tips


• Gentle stretching daily to help maintain tissue elasticity and joint mobility.


• Walk as much as possible to keep circulation healthy and maintain muscle tone.


• Have a daily rest to recover energy for the rest of the day’s activities.


• Trainers or similar footwear can help to reduce wear and tear to the knee and hip joints, and can also help reduce back pain when walking on hard pavements


• Walk tall, sit tall, be tall.


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