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CONVERSATIONS IN THE HUMANITIES


In 2011-2012, the Humanities Institute continued its series of events highlighting exciting areas of humani-


ties research at UC Davis and beyond. These lunch time brown bag events are designed to feature a rich area of research in the humanities, while appealing to both spe- cialists in that area and a broader campus and commu- nity audience. Following brief presentations, speakers opened a conversation about the area of research and its potential importance and impact in the humanities, in the academy, in our community, and beyond. In the fall, Chad Anderson, a doctoral student in history and Humanities Institute Dissertation Year Fellow, put his work on Native American monuments and place-mak- ing in conversation with broader dialogues around race, place, and space with the help of faculty panelists Hsuan Hsu of English and historian Christina Snyder, an ACLS visiting fellow from Indiana University. In the spring, Dissertation Year Fellow D.A. Caeton of Cultural Stud- ies tackled issues around blindness and citizenship in


‘‘Speakers opened a conversation about the area of research and its potential importance and impact in the humanities, in the academy, in our community, and beyond.’’


the nineteenth-century U.S. with commentators Sarita See, professor of Asian American Studies, and Doctoral Candidate Tristan Josephson, also of Cultural Studies. Caeton, who is completing a dissertation titled “Read- ing Between the Dots: The Somanormative Silhouette of Braille in U.S. Culture, 1830-1938” found the discus- sion with his panelists and the audience invigorating as he continued to work through how blind subjects as- similated as citizens and achieved self-determination in the modern liberal state.


d h i . u c d a v i s . e d u 21


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