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PEST 411


Pest of food Te stink bug looks for food sources beginning in the spring.


“In the Asian literature, the insect is a nuisance pest as well as an agricultural pest because of its propensity to feed on numerous vegetable and row crops, and fruits and ornamentals,” Hoebeke said. “It has the potential to be a threat to Georgia’s agricultural industry if established populations reach large numbers as in the North. Tey have sucking mouthparts to feed on fruits causing the fruit to dimple and the flesh to rot.” In 2010, Maryland and Pennsylvania reported serious damage to apple and grape harvests.


“Tis is like the invasion of the kudzu bug II, a small, curious little creature, which can be bad if you have 700 in your house, but it could be a bigger problem if it feeds on our agricultural products,” Horton said.


Cross the border When this newest stink bug does cross the state- line, citizen scientists can help. Both Hoebeke and Horton want to document the establishment and spread of this invasive species in Georgia and to alert proper agricultural authorities with up-to-date information.


Send digital images of a suspected stink bug to rhoebeke@uga.edu. Ship specimens in a crush-proof container to E. R. Hoebeke, Collection of Arthropods, Georgia Museum of Natural History, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.


To prepare the insect for the trip, capture one alive, place it in a container and put it in the freezer to kill it. Then carefully wrap and mail it. Please include the city or town the stink bug was collected in, date of collection and contact information.


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UAC MAGAZINE • NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012


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