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– made a small opening, stuffed it with grass and covered it with dead leaves. We realised in the spring that a female hedgehog had used it as a winter residence as she surprised us with 5 youngsters who then willingly helped us control the slugs in our back yard! The rotted leaves were also used in our veg area as compost the following year.


Leave as much windfall fruit as you can on the ground – as birds such as thrushes and blackbirds will feast on them. On sunnier days any late flying butterflies will also feed on them. I often cut fallen fruit up into small chunks and put them on my bird table so smaller birds can enjoy them too.


If you really have a mad urge for a tidy up then build a wildlife stack using all the bits and bobs which may be laying around the garden – the RSPB have a great tutorial here: http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/ gardening/insects/wildlifestack. aspx


95 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2012


Hand Embroidered Birds by www.catherinefreresmith.com


If you’re worried about what the neighbours might say, worry not as I have the perfect solution! This takes the form of a few rustic looking signs (home made of course) which read: “Wildlife Friendly Area”, “Local Nature Reserve” or “Humans Keep Out - Wildlife only”. These can be strategically placed around the ‘wild’ areas and will hopefully achieve a double whammy - in that you can sit back sknowing that you


have done ‘your bit’ for wildlife and hopefully will prick the conscience of neighbours, visitors and general passers-by – especially if they have just ‘devastated’ their own gardens with their cut price end-of-season bargain gardening kit!


Images of Wildlife Stack opposite courtesy of Dawn Painter.


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