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While a formula helps you setting a base price, there is more to pricing than


adhering to a formula, as


polymer clay artist Kirsten Miller from Quernus Crafts explains. Kirsten still finds putting a price on her cute creatures tricky:


“I think it’s trying to assess how other people value what I do. For a long time, I equated size with value, so because my sculptures are all pretty small, I didn’t think people would be prepared to spend much on them. It’s easy enough to work out roughly how much it actually costs to make a piece, but there’s also value in having a unique piece of art that’s been sculpted just for you to your specification. That’s the bit I find hard to put a price on.”


Although Kirsten is aware of the above mentioned pricing formula, she admits that she has never properly


applied it. Instead, she


discovered a series of helpful articles by American coach Molly Gordon and an article by American designer Megan Auman. The selling platform


59 | ukhandmade | Autumn 2012


Etsy also provides crafters with a lot of helpful advice. So how does she price up her own creatures?


“I differentiate between my standard range (the creatures listed in my Etsy shop) and the commissions I do (which form the majority of my work). My standard ranges are now priced to give me the option of going into retail if I want to. I basically work out how many creatures I can make in an hour, for example I can make 8 Wee Piglings in an hour. I charge my time at £16


an hour, so this works out at £2 each to make. Materials are fairly low cost, about 30p per Wee Pigling, so the base cost is £2.30.


The wholesale price is about £4, and the retail price is £8. I am conscious that I don’t tend to figure in all the other things I should perhaps take into account (overheads, packaging, time taken to list, promote, etc.), but this pricing regime is about as far as I dare to go for now!”


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