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Financial Systems has had great feedback on its latest round of liquidity bridge innovations, which have been geared specifically towards allowing brokers to manage their entire risk base, not just trades that have been handled via STP from oneZero Financial Systems’ back office interface, states Ralich.


He notes: “By providing brokers with more transparency in terms of A/B Book exposure, we have put the information they need right in their hands, enabling them to make the correct decisions in real time. We’ve identified limitations in how various trading platforms consolidate and manage risk, and have provided tools to our clients to transcend traditional ‘B-Book’ execution and dynamically monitor and adjust STP parameters and spreads using information and settings available through our technology.”


Cohen remarks: “Our risk management platform, LXRisk is a lot more than just a bridge; it has the capability of running specified execution rules per trader, per amount and per symbol. Automation allows true non-dealing desk capability and leaves no conflict between the broker and its clients. Along with the back office and reporting tools available, the broker can monitor the success of his trading behaviours and total results of the brokerage.”


While Latypoff adds: “Contemporary liquidity bridges support all kinds of trading operations and all execution modes, reducing risks down to zero. Moreover, all trading operations can easily be marked


INSTITUTIONAL FX SERVICES - THE BROKERS HANDBOOK 2012/2013 | 81


up by arbitrary values, allowing brokers to execute trades for their clients at a price constantly worse than prices they get at their counterparties, thus brokers can earn a constant amount of money on that price difference on every lot traded. Also, bridges do not enforce brokers to use only STP for all clients. One can easily choose groups of clients to stay on B-book, that is not execute their trades against external liquidity, thus retaining profitability of dealing desks with an option of switching quickly.”


Business engines


Te newest integrated bridging solutions offer low latency STP, flexible order routing, advanced customer profiling and wide administrative capabilities, in addition to their basic liquidity management operations. Commenting on his company’s


product, Cohen says Leverate’s LX Risk acts as a single point of information, gathering vital, online intelligence such as exposure, profit and loss, and rules settings in a single platform. “Tis saves the broker loads of time in management and risk management,” he adds.


Tese latest generation of integrated bridging solutions act as powerful and consolidated business engines. Higgins notes: “Monitoring performance and slippage in real time is essential information that a broker can use to maximise its profitability. Te Gold-i Gate Bridge provides rich real time information for the brokers, available in their everyday management tools, in addition to the unique Gold-i Position Keeper showing profitability and risk in clear and concise screens.”


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