This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
For example, you may define three tiers: the highest tier for your most critical business processes without which you cannot run your business, a middle tier for applications that are not critical but still important, and a lower tier for all other applications.


Keep in mind that it’s not just data recovery you’ll need to focus on. When you have to recover from a major outage, you’ll likely need to recover both data and applications. Many enterprises implement a DR plan for just data, assuming that servers and application environments will be manually rebuilt and recovered if they need to be. By relying on manual recovery processes for applications, you are putting your business at additional risk. Automated application recovery will be more reliable and perform more predictably because it will not be as dependent upon the skill of the administrators that are actually performing the recovery (your best trained administrators may not always be available when a real disaster hits).


Step 3: Match the right solutions to your recovery requirements


Once you’ve determined the key recovery metrics of RPO and RTO, you’ll need to consider just what type of IT infrastructure you need to meet them. Understand the recovery capabilities that various technologies deliver. Tape has low storage costs, but supports very lax RPO and RTO and requires a lot of administrative overhead during recoveries. Tis, however, may meet your requirements. If you need better


RPO and RTO performance, you may want to consider disk. Disk has higher storage costs, but can support very stringent RPO/RTO, requires significantly less administrative overhead for recoveries, and supports access to a variety of next generation data protection technologies like continuous data protection (CDP), asynchronous replication and WAN optimization that solve a lot of other recovery problems that tape cannot. Finally, don’t just consider data recovery technologies; look for technologies that can help automate application recovery as well for your highest recovery tier application environments.


Step 4: Test your DR plans


Tere is a big difference between theory and reality. We’ve probably all heard the story about the bumblebee. Scientists evaluating the aerodynamics of the bumblebee, given what we know about aeronautics, would have to conclude that it could not fly. And yet it does.


To be sure your DR plan will work as expected, you have to regularly test it. If you are using some form of replication to meet stringent DR requirements, these are complex configurations that can evolve and degrade over time in unexpected ways.


You want no surprises - your DR plan should work predictably. Newer technologies like server virtualization and application failover/failback can help make DR testing non-disruptive to production environments and much less expensive than it has been in the past. Regular testing also helps you fine tune and improve your recovery capabilities, evolving them over time as your own recovery requirements evolve.


Illustration of a DR Plan


Headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, IBFX is a leading provider of online foreign exchange trading services that serves over 35,000 clients across more than 140 countries. IBFX maintains two data centers, a main production center in Salt Lake City that houses all of their business-critical trade servers, and a remote data center in New York.


With data growth rates skyrocketing, IBFX was looking to maintain compliance while at the same time improving their recovery capabilities. Te main production center had a variety of heterogeneous servers and storage, and IBFX was looking for a solution that would provide the flexibility to accommodate all of them. Of particular concern were minimizing data loss on recovery, shortening recovery times, and solution scalability.


IBFX headquarters 76 | INSTITUTIONAL FX SERVICES - THE BROKERS HANDBOOK 2012/2013


Business process and outsourcing


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124