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William Lee


European Champion carved his way to the top


W


hile Hemel’s Olympic hero Max Whitlock was making history this summer, the


town can now also boast a European champion – in chainsaw carving. Tim Green reports. William Lee, 30, of Adeyfield Road, worked as a tree surgeon four years ago but as soon as he got his chainsaw licence, there was only one thing on his mind – carving. As the pictures demonstrate, he is fast becoming a master of his art. William revealed: “I am entirely self-taught. All the boys said I was pretty good so I started carving a few pieces. My first carving was a bear and bears still form the bulk of my work. My style has progressed and refined over the years. I have carved a wide variety of subjects, from birds, to dogs, horses, mythical creatures, green men, figures and benches. “As an art form, carving is one of the quickest. All my pieces are done in less than three days


28 l October 2012 l www.mynewsmag.co.uk


apart from the dragon heads which take twice that time. One is now in a park in London.” Last month, William took on 25 carvers from as far afield as Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the USA. Contestants compete over three days to produce the most imaginative sculptures. They each start with a piece of redwood timber, six ft. tall and three ft. in diameter, weighing over a tonne.


Using a variety of sizes of


‘If someone gives me a picture, I can imagine it in 3D. People send me pictures and I can imagine them – I’m artistic in that way’


chainsaw, they turn this into a sculpture of their own design. Judges take into account the artistic quality, technical skill and the use made of the whole log in deciding the European Champion. William’s


chainsaw, they turn this into a sculpture of their own design. Judges take into account the artistic quality, technical skill and the use made of the whole log in deciding the European Champion. William’s


apart from the dragon heads which take twice that time. One is now in a park in London.” Last month, William took on 25 carvers from as far afield as Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and the USA. Contestants compete over three days to produce the most imaginative sculptures. They each start with a piece of redwood timber, six ft. tall and three ft. in diameter, weighing over a tonne. Using a variety of sizes of


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