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Restaurant 65 gets a menu makeover Restaurant 65 in High Street, Hemel Hempstead.


restaurant. A


‘I wanted some inspiration and although the cuisine is different to mine, I wanted to see why his restaurant had two Michelin stars and mine didn’t’


Grant Young, owner and head chef at Restaurant 65, swapped Hemel Hempstead for Notting Hill to volunteer at Te Ledbury last month, after a family lunch at the eatery left him wanting to know more.


Grant said: “I went to congratulate the chef and we ended up chatting away. I asked him if he’d have me come in for a few days to see how and what they were doing and he said yes.”


Classically trained Grant has been cooking for more than 25 years and has worked at restaurants including the Ivy, Le Caprice and Champneys.


He explained to My Hemel & Leverstock Green News why he wanted to take a peek into head chef


local restaurateur has been inspired to spice up his menu after interning at a two Michelin star


Brett Graham’s kitchen.


“Chefs who work alone can often get stuck in a rut. I wanted some inspiration and although the cuisine is different to mine, I wanted to see why his restaurant had two Michelin stars and mine didn’t,” he said.


Grant opened Restaurant 65, which is in the High


Street, Hemel Hempstead, seven years ago. He and his wife Gina run the restaurant, whilst Grant also takes charge of the kitchen.


Te next menu change will be “heavily inspired” by Grants three day stint at Te Ledbury.


He said: “I’ve come home with a book of methods and ingredients I hadn’t typically use before. Te new menu will be lighter and made with a much fresher approach.


“It was a great experience and I’ve been very inspired


by my time at Te Ledbury. I was taken out of my comfort zone completely, but head chef Brett Graham is a very nice man.


“He doesn’t need to scream and shout, he’s got nothing to prove to anyone. His food says it all.”


www.mynewsmag.co.uk l October 2012 l


by Charlotte Gilbert 21


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