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HIX cooks up new look


THE RESTAURANT at Brown’s Hotel in Albemarle Street, previously called HIX at The Albemarle, has been renamed HIX Mayfair. The restaurant, which can now be accessed from Dover Street as well as Albemarle Street, will be signposted by a neon sign designed by Tracey Emin. To celebrate the change, Mark Hix and executive chef Lee Streeton have created a menu featuring some British classics, as well as lighter fish dishes and salads, with a focus on British seasonal ingredients. It will take on a


Maggs books novel art show


TWELVE ARTISTS will create works inspired by books or manuscripts from leading antiquarian bookseller Maggs Bros for a new exhibition at its 50 Berkeley Square shop. It is the first time that the buildings, occupied by Maggs for 75 years, have been given over to an exhibition of contemporary art.


more informal direction, bringing it in line with other HIX venues. A la carte and set menus will be available throughout the day and those looking for a light pre-theatre supper can sample the set menu, drop by for a drink and a few oysters or try the “snax” at the restaurant bar.


Maggs Beneath the Covers explores the interface between craft and fine art practice. It includes a “felt-belt-rope- ladder” inspired by Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels and a sculpture of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning recreated from prints of the literary couple. The exhibition runs until December 21.


A rock ’n’ Rolling Christmas


CARNABY – known for its music heritage as well as fashion heritage – is collaborating with the Rolling Stones for its Christmas installations, in celebration of the band’s 50th anniversary.


The decorations will consist of huge 3D


spheres suspended throughout Carnaby Street containing gold and silver vinyl


records emblazoned with the band’s iconic artwork and album covers. The Carnaby arches will also be dressed with The Stones’ iconic tongue logo.


The decorations go up from November 8 until January 6. In addition, there will be a Rolling Stones pop-up shop selling the new best-of album, and limited-edition clothing.


SJT artist’s solo show Underground exhibition


FROM OCTOBER 10-20 (10am-8pm), contemporary British artist Toby Ziegler will install an exhibition in the basement of Q Park, a car park space accessed by lift and concealed 14 floors below street level at 3-9 Old Burlington Street. Ziegler will create a new series of works tailor-made for the space: his five imposing sculptures will be influenced by Brueghel’s painting The Cripples and will be surrounded by large-scale light boxes depicting an abstract thicket of horses’ legs, derived from a detail of a Piero della Francesca fresco. The light boxes will provide the only light in the installation.


LAST MONTH, a sweeping staircase by artist/designer Mark Humphrey, crafted from 200 tonnes of finest Carrara marble, was unveiled at the opening of the new St James’s Theatre, the first new theatre to open in London for 30 years. This month, Humphrey will be presenting his maiden solo show Art in Life from October 9-27 at the Osborne Samuel gallery in Bruton Street. The show includes several innovative pieces from


Humphrey’s diverse portfolio that blur the boundaries between contemporary sculpture and design and explores the marriage between fine art and functionality that is evolving within the contemporary art market.


THE ANNUAL Tabasco Oyster Shucking Championships took place at Bentley’s Oyster Bar and Grill, bringing together the best shuckers from Ireland and Britain. Guests at the event included Brian Turner, who compered, Silvano Giraldin, Ainsley Harriet and Eric Lanlard. Richard Corrigan (left), owner of Bentley’s was crowned the fastest schucker.


THE PARALYMPIC torch came to Regent Street before making its way through Westminster to the Olympic Stadium for the opening. At the junction where Air Street meets Regent Street, the torch was handed over to five new torchbearers who then continued their way down the Regent Street curve towards Piccadilly Circus.


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