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Crown submits St James’s proposals


THE CROWN ESTATE has submitted four planning applications as part of a £450 million redevelopment plan that will transform a major part of St James’s and create nearly 340,000 sq ft of mixed-use accommodation between Regent Street and Haymarket. The lead scheme, known as St


James’s Market, is a commercial redevelopment of two blocks (14-20 Regent Street and 52-56 Haymarket) to create 21,000 sq ft of office and 45,000 sq ft of retail and restaurant space. It also includes world-class 21st


century architecture and preserved historic facades, together with a traffic- free public realm with public art, which will bring the area back into line with the quality of historic St James’s.


First pop-up club pops into the RA


LAST MONTH saw the opening of London’s first pop-up members’ club in Mayfair. Located in the Senate Rooms at the Royal Academy at 6 Burlington Gardens, The Burlington Social Club comes courtesy of Pret A Diner – a dining experience from German company Kofler & Kompanie, which brings together Michelin star chefs, art and music for a social drinking and dining experience. The Burlington Social Club is open daily


from 6.30pm to 12.30am until November 17. Members can choose the lounge or one of 30 seats on the edge of a central scaffold structure of exposed scaffold poles, aged wood and glass, and watch mixologists prepare a range of cocktails and chefs serve up a range of Asian inspired dishes. They are also invited to discover RA


Now, the first show ever that involves work by all the current Royal Academicians. For further details, visit www.pretadiner.com.


Golden Lion in the pink


THOMAS PINK has recently been named the official outfitter for the British and Irish Lions’ 125th tour to Australia in 2012, and to celebrate the partnership, it will be transforming The Golden Lion Pub in St James’s into “The Pink Lion” for the week from October 30-November 2.


Each night, supporters will be invited to take part in various rugby themed activities, such as a “Pink Lion Question of Sport” pub quiz, “Pink TV” showing screenings of historic matches and a special “Pink Lion Lock-in”, with former Lions players. All the events are free and open to all.


Fashion goes Gaga for Treacy


PHILIP TREACY’S show was one of the standout moments of last month’s London Fashion Week. Lady Gaga opened the show, donning a neon pink floor-length shroud and a gargantuan Swarovski crystal star ring. Other highlights of the show – held at


the Royal Courts of Justice – included handcrafted crystal hats and jewellery created with Swarovski Elements and Michael Jackson’s archive costumes – also accessorised with Swarovski crystal star rings and sculptural crystal cuffs.


A month in Mayfair


SOME 50,000 spectators were treated to pop-up circus performances from 247 artists of 17 nationalities as the area around Piccadilly Circus and Regent Street became Piccadilly Circus Circus. The finale of the event, which was held in celebration of the Olympic Games, saw a visual spectacle created by French artists Les Studios de Cirque – performed on zipwires soaring 30 metres above the audience.


FASHIONISTAS came out in force all over the West End for Vogue’s Fashion’s Night Out. The luxury fashion houses of Bond Street and shops in Oxford Street and South Molton Street threw open their doors, offering customers drinks and discounts. Fashion designer Corrie Nielsen showcased her autumn/winter collection in Burlington Arcade, while on Regent Street, more than 40 retailers, restaurants and bars took part.


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