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SIR PETER BLAKE (LEFT) AND ROY ACKERMAN IN THE ARTIST’S STUDIO


A BRUSH WITH THE ARTIST is priced from £40 and includes breakfast, a private viewing and studio transfers where applicable. Breakfasts take place on the following dates:


October 9: With Martin Fuller followed by a private studio tour in Brixton


October 10: With Roger McGough and a poetry reading and book signing


October 11: With Bruce McLean and Brad Faine followed by a studio visit


October 13: With Brendan Neiland and a private display of work


October 14: With Christian Furr and a private show of work


For more information or to book, please phone the hotel’s dedicated arts line on 020 7317 6503 or email reservations.451@dorchestercollection.com.


Photography is also featured, with a series


of London panoramas taken by former Rolling Stone Bill Wyman, and some striking celebrity candids ranging from Madonna puffing a cigar to Kelly Brook in a fit of giggles, by paparazzo Richard Young.


The legendary snapper has photographed anyone who’s anyone, from Liz Taylor and Richard Burton to Mick Jagger and Michael Jackson. “I’ve known Richard for many years now,” says Ackerman. “He’s king of the circuit generally, a great photographer and a great friend.”


45 Park Lane is celebrating Frieze Art Fair this month by hosting an artistic breakfast series known as “A Brush with the Artist”. It will give people the chance to meet some


of the artists.


Art lovers and buyers can eat breakfast with the artist before viewing a private display of their work, or even visiting their studios. “Visiting a studio really allows you to get to know the artist,” says Ackerman. “Although artists are sometimes very


gregarious, they are also notoriously shy. But if you can get them in their own studios, you tend to find that they will talk much more openly.” Dotted across London from Brixton to Spitalfields, the studios are all very different, says Ackerman. “Some are light, modern and airy, while others are literally the attic where the artist paints away with his brush. They all have their own idiosyncrasies.”


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