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very best of Rotary’s history with scholarships while expanding opportunities and simplifying rules, in order to make funding education easier than ever.


To experience the greatest success with scholarships under


Future Vision, it is best to utilize the model as it is presented rather than attempt to re-create the Ambassadorial Scholarships program. With that in mind, OFN created this guide to illustrate what is possible.


SCHOLARSHIP TYPES 1/ DISTRICT GRANT SCHOLARSHIPS


 Future Vision offers maximum flexibility in funding scholars.


 Districts can determine the types of scholars they wish to sponsor using funds from a district grant.


These could include:


 Undergraduate or graduate students studying locally, any subject matter


 Undergraduate or graduate students studying abroad, any subject matter


 Study periods of any length (language training, a certificate program, a semester, a year or more)


The district leadership should determine its own preferences, applications, and timetables for district grant-funded scholars. Your Future Vision coordinator at the Foundation is


always available to help, and can provide examples of how other districts have organized their district grant scholarship process.


A monthly feature of the Rotary Global History Fellowship (RGHF).


Issue #128


District grants offer clubs and districts flexibility in carrying out activities that support the Foundation's mission.


Districts are encouraged to distribute these grant funds for relatively short-term activities, either local or international.


Districts can request up to 50 percent of their District Designated Fund (DDF) in one annual block grant.


TheDistrict SHARE Committee shall determine the allocation of District Grant Funds between:  local and international humanitarian projects


 scholarships  vocational training opportunities


 and disaster relief


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