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MOTI MAHAL SHOWCASES ANI’S PASSION FOR FOOD


Moti Mahal is one of London’s best known Indian restaurants, situated in the heart of London’s West End close to the tourist centre of Covent Garden and theatreland. The restaurant’s main dining room of offers a view into the kitchen where chef Anirudh Arora’s creates menus inspired by his life-long pas- sion for the cuisines of India’s Grand Trunk Road. Nostalgic favourites served at Moti Mahal include bhalla papadi chaat a teatime dish popular in the streets of North India featuring crisp-fried pastry and chickpeas with a tama- rind and mint chutney. The current menu celebrates the fes- tivals of the Grand Trunk Road, from Syrian Christian events to major public holidays. True to Indian custom, there is no distinction between starters and main; instead, dishes are delivered in fluid succession as they are prepared. Born and raised primarily in Delhi, Ani travelled all around India as a child visiting his army officer father. These jour- neys bought Ani into contact with Indian cuisine from across the country, and this started his interest in food and cooking. Once Ani finished his schooling in Delhi he moved to Lucknow and began his training at the Institute of Hotel Management, one of India’s most prestigious catering schools. From there Ani was chosen to be one of 15 students - out of


100,000 applicants - to become a trainee at the Oberoi Hotel Group’s’ Centre of Learning Development. It was here that Ani perfected his culinary skills and learnt the intricacies of Indian cuisine.


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After graduation Ani was one of the founding chefs at the Oberoi Udaivilas in Udaipur, where he remained for two and a half years before moving to London in 2003, working as the Sous Chef at Benares in Berkeley Square. In 2005,


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