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What makes the G280 such an improvement? It’s what you expect from a super mid-size luxury jet; speed, range, safety and comfort. From an altitude of 43,000 feet covering 3,682 nautical miles, speed of Mach 0.80, from Dulles International in Washington D.C. to Geneva in 7 hours and 47 minutes is just one example of the exceptional qualities of the G280. How about traveling at Mach 0.80 from Dallas to Washington D.C. for a total flight of 2 hours and 20 minutes, landing with NBAA IFR reserves? Let’s leave from Paris Le Bourget Airport for a meeting in White Plains, New York at Mach 0.80 with air time as quick as 7 hours and 40 minutes? All depen- dant on flight conditions. These improvements are in part to a new high-speed wing design and Honeywell HTF7250G engines improving the G280’s fuel efficiency. Giving the G280 a shorter balanced field length of 4,750 feet, allows the G280 the ability to land and take off from many air fields.


Within the cockpit, Gulfstream brings a proven philoso- phy from Gulfstream's large-cabin aircraft to the super mid-size G280, the PlaneView280™; improved safety through reduced pilot workload and improved situation- al awareness. With the optional HUD II and Enhanced Vi- sion Systems (EVS II), which can be used during low vis- ibility, and additional part of the system which includes auto-braking to enhance safety and improve brake wear and tear, the G280 is top at its game. This is the first to be done in the industry.


Within this class of aircraft, you would most likely ex- pect the same large and comfortable cabins, which sometimes comes at the sacrifice of other items. Not so with the G280. You get large windows; which reduce fatigue and provide a very comfortable environment, a large galley; to indulge yourself while in flight, and easy access to baggage.


38 FOCUS of SWFL 2011


©Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation


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