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Lighter


The new Porsche 911 Carrera 4 unites the excellent performance and efficiency of the new generation of the 911 Carrera with the dynamic benefits of the latest version of the active all-wheel drive system PTM (Porsche Traction Management). The typical Porsche all-wheel drive with rear-focused layout in this latest 911 version guarantees maximum vehi- cle dynamics on a wide vari- ety of road surfaces and in all weather conditions. The new 911 Carrera 4 models deliver traction and dynamic perfor- mance the power of four.


The new all-wheel drive 911 is being launched on the mar- ket in four versions – as the 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Car- rera 4S and each as Coupé and Cabriolet. They sport the same traits as the rear-wheel drive versions: their light- weight body design, suspen- sion, engines and gearboxes are identical, the only excep- tion being modifications related to the all-wheel drive. This means that despite a higher level of engine and driving performance, all four models consume significantly less fuel than the previous models; total savings for individual versions are as much as 16 per cent. In addition, the new 911 Carrera 4 is lighter in weight.


All new models have a 7-speed man- ual gearbox as standard, and the Porsche Doppelkupplung gearbox is available as an option. The 911 Car- rera 4 Coupé with 350 hp can sprint


30 FOCUS of SWFL 2012


from zero to 60mph in as little as 4.2 seconds (Cabriolet: 4.5 s). The Coupé and Cabriolet of the 911 Car- rera 4 S each have a 3.8-litre rear- mounted boxer engine that produc- es 400 hp; this enables acceleration to 60mph in 3.9 seconds (Cabriolet: 4.1 seconds), depending on suitable equipment configuration.


more agile


ment (PTM). In July 2011, Porsche crowned the model series with the 911 Carrera 4 GTS, whose 3.8-litre engine was boosted to 408 hp.


In the new 911 Carrera 4, a new menu in the instrument cluster informs the driver how the PTM all-wheel drive is currently distributing engine power. In addition, with the debut of the 911 Carrera all-wheel drive models Porsche is introduc- ing the optional Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) to the entire model range, which controls distance to traffic ahead and vehicle speed. When ordered with PDK, the ACC system adds the safety function Porsche Active Safe (PAS), which helps to prevent front-end collisions. In ad- dition, Porsche offers a new sliding glass sunroof as an optional feature for the 911 Carrera Coupé. Driving 911 cars with a manual gearbox and Sport Chrono pack can


The new all-wheel drive models replace a very successful previ- ous generation, of which a total of about 24,000 units have been sold since 2008. This represents a 34 per cent share of total sales of second generation 997 models. This previ- ous generation launched with one of the greatest development steps in power train technology that the 911 with all-wheel drive ever made: new were the engines with direct petrol injection, Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) gearbox and electronically controlled Porsche Traction Manage-


now be even sportier: In Sport Plus mode, the system automatically double-declutches during down- shifts.


The most distinct identifying feature of the 911 with all-wheel drive is still the wide rear section: compared to the two-wheel drive 911 Carrera models, the rear wheel housings each extend further outward, and the rear tires are much wider. The traditional red light band that con- nects the two taillights has also tak- en on a new form.


Faster By Dan Myricks


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