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From page 49 Cheyenne Fever It took another year for Cheyenne to begin to trust a couple of volunteers


to do more than halter and lead him. He chose Joe, our gruff looking but sensitive Equipment Manager, to buddy up to. Joe could halter him and take him out for walks or go to a favorite grazing area. Cheyenne felt safe with Joe. Joe did not ask much of Cheyenne and was ‘just there’ with him.


We then had Lea and the Reiki ladie’s


come in and give Cheyenne an emotionally healing Reiki treatment. Reiki is a form of massage and is calming to horses (and peo- ple) and they seem to look forward to their turn. I always feel that if it is hands on and does not hurt the horse then it is good for them. It took the ladie’s over one hour to get close to Cheyenne.


Volunteer Adri was there at the time hold-


ing the lead rope during the Reiki session. It seemed that once Cheyenne had let the ladies get close he did seem to accept what they were doing. During the session, Cheyenne started looking to Adri for safety and cour- age. Since that day, Cheyenne has picked Adri as his own person. Adri had very little experience with a horse like Cheyenne, but she has had help from those of us at the rescue with more hands on experi- ence with horses of this precarious nature.


Then it was time to put Cheyenne in his own stall and give him his safe


place. Only Adri, Joe, and I were allowed to go into the stall. Cheyenne had to learn to be haltered without swinging his hind end towards us. He is not the type of horse that you can reprimand. He needs to be redirected and praised when he gets it right. There were months and months of hand walk- ing him thru the maze, laid out with cavaletties. We make patterns for him to walk through or to walk over. That is a very good tool to get a horse to keep his mind on what he is being asked to do.


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