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It was one of those lifetime moments. It felt like a bolt of lightening hit


me right between the eyes. I almost fell backwards from the intensity of it and “it” was now crystal clear; From around the world, people from multi- ple countries had traveled untold thousands of miles, spent thousands in their nations currency to sit out in the middle of a desolate wilderness to witness wild horses grazing on grass. I now knew why.


The symbol of freedom that wild horses represent is not exclusive to


Americans alone. It is a basic element of the human spirit, and all people around the world, to respect, yearn and desire to hold in their hearts, even if for only a moment, the true spirit and purity of wild horses in the wild. Not wild horses confined by fences or harassed by corrupt government agencies but instead, revered, nurtured and protected so that all people across this planet can experience their wonder.


That evening, in the waning sun over Outer Mongolia, forever changed us.


It reinforced our commitment and drive to save the last free roaming herds that grace our western United States and yes, eco-tourism does work. We have seen it at an international level with herds of people flocking to see such successes as the reintroduced Takhi of Outer Mongolia. After leaving Hustai we made contact with a nomadic tribe that agreed for us to lease horses from them for an extended trek across central Mongolia. To ensure the safety of both our horses and ourselves the tribal leader assigned his 14 year old son and his 14 year old nephew to accompany Terry, myself and our guide on this trek. Likewise, I had contracted a 4WD drive support ve- hicle with driver and cook to follow us and set up camp as we progressed.


We traveled on our horses from sun up to sun down and slept amongst the


nomads and their herds of horses, sheep, goats, cattle and yaks for days. At night, my 6’2” head would poke out of our small Mongolia tent and not a night went by when either a horse, yak or dog would sniff my bald spot; the experience was spectacular. But with all that we saw, heard, smelled, touched and tasted it dawned on me during the very last few hours of our days in the saddle that something was off, something was different and it moved me to the point that I stopped my horse and called Terry over.


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