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John Brand Lizzie and Hezkiah traveled up the Chisholm Trail to Kansas at least


twice. They rode behind the herd in a buggy drawn by a team of horses. For several years she and her husband, after coming up the Chisholm Trail, spent the fall and winter months in St. Louis, where Lizzie made extra money by keeping books for other cattlemen. While in St. Louis, she also liked to "treat" herself to some finer things, like current dress fashions, fine clothes and jewels.


During the Civil War, Lizzie was able to grow her cattle herd by oversee-


ing a process called "brushpopping". Since so many men were away at war and there were few fences to keep the cattle contained, the numbers of "unbranded" cattle in the brush of South Texas began to grow. At that time "unbranded" cattle were fair game- you found them - you kept them. Lizzie had her cowboys comb the thickets for cattle -"brushpopping" round them up and transport them to her growing ranch.


Hezkiah passed away in 1914 in El Paso. It is rumored that Lizzie pur-


chased a $600 top-of-the-line coffin for her husband. When she signed the bill of payment, she wrote across it "I loved this old buzzard this much."


Lizzie eventually became somewhat of a recluse. She lived meagerly,


wearing frugal dresses and just living on a diet of soup and crackers. On October 9, 1924 Lizzie Johnson Williams passed away at the age of 81. Her estate totaled $250,000. Family members found thousands of dollars in diamonds locked away in her basement and she had large holdings in Aus- tin real estate.


Lizzie was a true "pioneer" of her time and a great inspiration to women of the old west..and today!


Visit us at www.buckarooleather.com for more stories of the Old West and thanks for reading our monthly contribution to tCmagazine.


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