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TX S C T Lizzie Johnson Williams was a “pioneer” of


the old west in every sense of the word. She was smart, hardworking, a businesswoman and she loved the finer things in life. Lizzie Johnson Williams was the first and only woman in Texas history to accompany her own herd of Texas longhorns up the Chisolm Trail.


Elizabeth E. Johnson was born in Missouri in


1843. Lizzie moved to Hays County, Texas where her father started the Johnson Institute in 1852. At sixteen she started to teacher at her fathers school. She moved to teach at other schools in Texas all the while saving her money. She was smart with her money and invested it in stocks. She pur- chased $2,500 worth of stock in the Evans, Snider, Bewell Cattle Company of Chicago. She earned 100 percent dividends for three years straight and then sold her stock for $20,000!


On June 1, 1871, Lizzie invested her money in cattle and registered her


own brand , CY, in the Travis County brand book along with her mark. She was an official cattle woman.


In the summer of 1879, at the age of thirty-six, she married Hezkiah G


Williams. Hezkiah was a preacher and widower who had several children. After her marriage, Lizzie continued to teach and invest in cattle. Lizzie was a smart businesswoman, even after her marriage she continued to maintain control over her wealth and cattle business. A progressive thinker, she had her husband sign a paper agreeing that all of her property remained hers.


Hezkiah did not have the same "head" for business that his wife pos-


sessed. In 1881, on his own, he entered into the cattle business. Along with poor business skills, Hezkiah also liked to drink. Lizzie had to constantly help her husband out of financial trouble.


E A AT by Buckaroo


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