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HERITAGE&CONSERVATION SPECTUS WINDOW SYSTEMS DESIGNS ELITE


70 STONE CILL ADAPTORS FOR IRELAND Leading profile manufacturer, Spectus Windows Systems, has launched two new stone cill adaptors for their Elite 70 PVC-U window and door systems into the Irish market.


Product manager at Spectus, Chris Ross said: “Te new stone cill adaptors for Elite 70 were originally designed to meet the needs of our customer Frames Direct, however the PVC-U stone cill adaptors are now available to all fabricators and installers in Ireland.


With Frames Direct anticipating increased requests throughout


Ireland for 70mm frames due to the growing demand for triple glazing, it was essential before committing to orders for Elite 70 that Spectus could provide the fabricator and installer with stone cill adaptors that offered a firm clip action between cill and profile.


Manager at Frames Direct, Quentin Doherty said: “We’ve used


Spectus’ Elite 63 profiles for many years and are therefore aware of all the benefits that multi-chambered profile from Spectus can offer. However, we predict that over the next three to five years there’ll be increased demand in Ireland for triple glazing and 70mm frames.


“Whilst we wanted to continue working with Spectus, we could only do so if it could offer us the appropriate stone cill adaptors. I have to admit that we’re all very impressed by the speedy response of its Product Development team.”


Te adaptors come in two sizes 20mm and 50mm and are available ex-stock in White, Light Oak and Rosewood grained foils as standard. Tey can also be ordered in any of the 70 coloured foils in Spectus’ Spectrum range.


For more details about Spectus’ range or to place an order email contacting@spectus.co.uk or call 01625 420400.


EXTENSION BUT NO U-TURN IN SIGHT


FOR VAT ON LISTED BUILDINGS WORKS The Government looks set to proceed with its plan to begin charging VAT on approved alterations to listed buildings, although following extensive lobbying it has extended the transitional period for works already under way until 2015.


Chancellor George Osborne announced in the March Budget that the long-standing VAT exemption for approved works on listed buildings was an anomaly that needed correcting – similar to the VAT treatment of caravans and hot pasties.


So the exemption would be released and under the new treatment, 20 per cent VAT would be charged on all works carried out after 1st October this year unless contracts were in place or listed building consent had been applied for before Budget day, 21 March 2012.


A transition period was also proposed, meaning that if work had begun before Budget day and could be finished by 20 March 2013, it would still attract the zero


rate. Since the Budget, the heritage sector has lobbied hard for a reversal of the proposals, arguing that many projects that are already under way cannot possibly be finished by 1st October.


‘if work had begun before Budget day and could be finished by 20 March 2013, it would still attract the zero rate’


After more lobbying, the Government has announced a special dispensation for churches and other listed places of worship,


74 « Clearview NMS « September 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


but this will not extend to other listed buildings.


In the latest proposals published on 10th


August, the transitional period for works already under way or where consent was obtained before Budget day, has been extended until 30 September 2015.


It seems unlikely that there will be a u-turn on this so owners, charities and other organisations charged with the care of listed buildings believe historic buildings are bound to suffer as a result.


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