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TRAINING


BUSINESSES HELD BACK BY LACK OF MANAGEMENT SKILLS


Almost one employer in five (18%) expects staff to receive training prior to promotion to management positions, despite the majority of employers (93%) believing that low levels of management skills are harming their business.


Tis is according to research by the


Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM), which also found that 43% of businesses do not have a talent plan in place to ensure a future supply of managers. Nearly half (47%) of employers said that the key barrier to ensuring an effective pipeline of leaders through the organisation was a lack of internal staff capability.


‘the key barrier to ensuring an effective pipeline of leaders through the organisation was a lack of internal staff capability’


Te ILM’s recommendations for improving the talent pipeline:


• Create a talent plan to develop essential skills before employees are promoted to management positions.


• Develop the right skills (communication, people management and planning).


• Consider personal qualities, such as emotional intelligence, ability to inspire, creativity and innovation.


• Technical skills matter but should not be over-valued.


But the ILM’s report “Te leadership and management talent pipeline” warns that, because of a lack of succession planning, employers are failing to capitalise on internal talent and are having to rely on “expensive and risky” external recruitment instead. According to the research, which gathered responses from 750 managers with responsibility for talent management, only


55% of businesses recruit from their internal talent pool for managerial positions, falling to 50% for senior management roles.


Charles Elvin, chief executive of the ILM, said: “Te clear link between management and leadership capability and productivity means that organisations should be fully focused on developing managers not just for their current role, but for the future goal of their organisation.


“Developing leadership capability at all


levels enables organisations to promote from within instead of relying on external recruitment, which can be expensive and risky. Businesses with strong internal talent plans can also reap the benefits of improved company culture and employee loyalty.”


Companies looking to buy leadership or management training for its workforce, may register for a free buyers’ guide to training.


www.personneltoday.com


RICHARD JOINS FENESTRATION COLLEGE Find out all the latest news and join in our forum discussions. Log on to our website:


www.clearview-uk.com


Te Fenestration College has appointed Richard Bulcock as Head of Field Based Assessment and Apprenticeship.


Richard has been involved in the training sector for several years employed as training officer for a large well- established training company. He has focused on customer excellence, formal compliance and brings with him a wealth of experience and knowledge.


52 « Clearview NMS « September 2012 « www.clearview-uk.com


With a pedigree for nurturing candidates and apprentices, in the last couple of years he was the Assessor behind the Apprentice of the year at G10 and also behind the Advanced Apprentice of the year runner up at the Proskills awards 2011.


Arron Clegg said: “We


are delighted that Richard has chosen to join the Fenestration College as part of the management team to head up our entire Field Based


Operations. We are sure that his expertise will bring added value to the College, Learners, Apprentices and Employers alike. Richard joins the College in the same week that the Fenestration Academy is unveiled to industry - a purpose built training centre dedicated to the Glass and Glazing Industry. We will continue to invest in the College and the Academy as we expand our market share.”


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