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spotlight WHAT’S MAKING THE NEWS IN BRISTOL? ART StrEAT in action FOOD MATTERS Babes Worm by Conor Harrington


ART ACTION


Four high-profile British artists have joined ART ACTION


@ THE STATION, an auction of a collection of more than 30 artworks by local, national and international artists in Bristol.


Organised by the Creative Youth Network and Art Action for Kids, the latest artists to join the roster are Ian Francis, Tom Bagshaw, D*Face and Conor Harrington. The entire collection will be auctioned off starting on 18 October as part of the corporate launch celebrations at The Station, Bristol’s £5.75 million youth hub currently being developed in the city centre. Psst, young Bristolians – want the chance to see your own artwork hung alongside that of the professionals? Just take a digital shot of your artwork and upload it to the ‘Art Auction & Competition’ event on The Station’s Facebook page. Artwork must be 2D but can be in any medium including painting, graffiti, digital, illustration, textile, print and photography.


creativeyouthnetwork.org.uk


You never know when or where a new eatery will pop up in Bristol. Take the Café on the Square, for example; a dilapidated toilet block in Sea Mills that has now become a


not-for-profit café run by the community, for the community. The café was officially opened by The Princess Royal, and made local and national headlines; it even got a mention on Radio 2’s Chris Evans breakfast show. We’re less amazed to hear that Arnos Vale Cemetery is to host a one-off family-friendly street-food festival; after all, the Cem is already the setting for popular cafés Atrium and Whisk. At the StrEAT fest, vendors will be serving a range of diverse food; StrEAT is a global street food collective, so expect lots of spicy deliciousness from countries such as Thailand, India, Ghana and, err, Wales, in “an upbeat mardi gras atmosphere.” The StrEAT Food Collective will be serving up hot dinners at Arnos


Fancy a bit of D*Face on your living room wall?


Vale Cemetery on Saturday 1 September between 5-10pm; read the blog at streatfoodcollective.com


Café society


Former toilet, Café on the Square; plans to name it the Joe Orton Café were scotched by the council....


MINI-FEST


BETTER FOOD


What’s going on this year? No Kite Festival, no more Ashton


Court Fest, and now no Organic Food Fest?


But nil desperandum, organic foodie fans, for Bristol’s award- winning Better Food Company is set to fill the breach, with a series of events featuring local farmers, chefs and other experts. “The Organic Food Festival is such a great way of uniting producers, suppliers and customers, bringing a new dimension to food that you don’t get any other way,” said Better Food Company MD Phil Haughton. “As it’s taking a year off, we decided we’d have our own mini-festival – there’s so much to celebrate and champion.” Events across the week include a ‘wellies-on’ visit to five local organic farms and the usual roster of talks and demos; Phil’s brother Barny Haughton pops up in the St Werburgh’s café for an evening of pasta-making and eating, and there’ll be a host of visiting producers and makers, enthusiastically sharing their goods with customers. • From 22-29 September betterfood.co.uk


www.mediaclash.co.uk Clifton Life 9


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