This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
This sporting life


FEl the Fear I


ANDY TORBET is the real Action-Man deal – extreme adventurer, caver, ice-climber, sea-kayaker and diver. And when he’s not camping on an iceberg, he lives in Bristol, discovers DERI ROBINS


t’s all very well, Daniel Craig dressing up as 007, and pretending to parachute into the Olympic stadium; we all know that at the end of the working day, after all


the assumed heroics and stick-on scars, he gets to go home to a nice warm home and Rachel Weisz. Andy Torbet, however, is the real deal.


Extreme adventurer, presenter and zoologist, he’s Bond and Attenborough rolled into one rather attractive package. He’s a top caver and diver, and holds some of the highest qualifications as a mountaineering and climbing instructor, caver and sea-kayaker. After completing his degree in zoology,


Andy spent ten years in the British Forces as a bomb disposal officer, diver and paratrooper on operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia and Kosovo. Since he left the Forces he has presented on programmes such as Coast (he’s just finished series seven, and is “currently involved in more extreme ideas” for series eight), Landward and The Adventure Show. And in September his latest series, Operation Iceberg,


is due to screen on BBC Two. As the programme’s ice climber and ice diver, Andy will be collecting samples for the team and exploring the glacier and iceberg’s most inaccessible places. So; is he completely fearless, or what? “Not at all,” he says. “Fear is healthy, a


lack of it is insane. Fear is a useful tool for flagging up potential danger. We can then assess those dangers and either disregard them, because it turns out they are irrational or insignificant, or mitigate and reduce them if they may end up killing us. If I never felt fear I’d be fairly careless with my safety, and would have been dead a long time ago. Luck only gets you so far.” So what does frighten him? Spiders? “Pretty much the same things that frighten everyone else. We’re scared outside our comfort zone. I’m not scared cave diving or free-climbing because I’ve done it for years and am well trained in it. You can’t flick a switch and choose to not be scared, but you can choose what to do with the emotion, and to try to control it. “A common fear is public speaking. I was anxious when I first started, so I used that to motivate me to spend a long time on the talk, and then countless hours rehearsing it. Keeping things in perspective is key. Before I go onto a stage for a talk, I remind myself that even if it all goes horribly wrong, it’s not the end of the world.” Is there anything that he wouldn’t do? “Lots – not because I’m scared, but because it was contrived or untrue to myself. I’ve been offered a few shows in the States which just sounded so ridiculous and made a mockery of what I did in the Forces, so I immediately said ‘no’. The bottom line is you have to look at yourself in the mirror each day and be content with who is looking back at you.” Andy can’t remember the exact moment


(*AND DO IT ANYWAY) 72 Clifton Life www.mediaclash.co.uk


he chose his career path, “but my mother tells the story of me when I was about three, swimming across the carpet in my pants, pretending to be a frogman with my Action Man. I think I always wanted to be a soldier,


*


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124