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September 2012— www.sunlakessplash.com


FEATURES 29


Art Sloane U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs


is led in Arizona by Sandra Flint. Sandra has a 33-year career with the Department and has led the offi ce in Arizona for the last nine years. Her husband works at the VA Hospital, and I know them both. She previously served in various offi ces in Philadelphia, Washington D.C., San Francisco and Albuquerque. Sandra has 470 employees with 174 processing claims. At present there are 22,000 claims pending, and daily I am asked why it takes so long. At present the average days to complete or ADC is 359.2 days. Why so long? After WWII and Korea, veterans were more liable to put in one to two claims. The amount now exceeds 10 different reasons. Even if you have a claim pending, each reason you put down needs complete investigation by law. I asked Sandra what if the claim on just fi ve would equal 100%? Why do you keep going? She answered that is the law and each must be investigated and documented and 70% take over 125 days with the amount of different papers submitted and the 40 years since Vietnam. Recently, claims by Vietnam veterans, for new reasons that came to light because of Agent Orange, were pushed to be fi nished because of the age of the claimants. Claims are paid from the date of the fi rst claim, and many members have received from one to two hundred thousand dollars. In addition to processing claims, the offi ce has responsibility for the home loan program for Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico and California and the Vocational Rehabilitation programs and is one of the eight National Call Centers with an 800 number. The All Three Wars Veterans Association,


a very unique group composed of persons who served during WWII, Korea and Vietnam, is reaching out to other vets who served during these wars. They do not have monthly meetings but have a once-a-year reunion and publish a newsletter quarterly. They maintain contact through email and phone. The U.S. is divided into six regions with a director for each region. They are based in Surprise, AZ after having moved from Arroyo Grande, CA. Please contact them at email all3wars@aol.com or call


623-703-8188 or look at


their website:


www.all3wars.org. Honor Flight of Arizona is still trying


to take all our WWII Veterans to see their WWII Memorial in Washington D.C. Why is this a problem? It takes donations since they and all of us do not want these “Greatest Generation veterans” to have to pay themselves, and many cannot afford this trip. You can help by making a donation to this worthy endeavor by sending a donation to P.O. Box 12258, Prescott, AZ 86304. Boeing recently made a contribution of $13,000, which was enough to send 10 WWII veterans and three volunteers to act as guardians on a fl ight. You may go as a guardian if you pay your own way. The job of a guardian is to help these WWII veterans in any way you are able. Many are in wheelchairs and might need someone to push them. Go to www.HonorFlightAz.org or call for information at 928-377-1020. Art Sloane may be contacted at 480-802-6810 or artgbeard@aol.com. 


Conservation Corner


ECC of IronOaks


Ilene O’Meara Most people overwater their landscapes.


Water for longer periods of time but less frequently and turn your irrigation system off if we receive at least one-half inch of rain. Use a rain gauge or a coffee can or other


container, as long as it has a fl at bottom, vertical


sides, and is deep enough so


drops of water won’t splash out. Place the container in your landscape so trees, fences or sprinklers do not affect the amount of water that will accumulate. After a rain simply use a ruler to measure. 


SUN LAKES SPLASH


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