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Dhal, Biryani, Tikka Masala. For many culinary connoisseurs, the mere mention of these words is like music for the mouth. Luckily, St. Lucia’s Rodney Bay is home to Spice of India, where the food sings. “Indian cuisine is misunderstood by many people,” says head chef and owner, Adil Sherwani. “People think of it as overly spicy and greasy, and that’s a shame.”


Chef Adil and his talented team feel it is their mission to make modern Indian cuisine that focuses on freshness and flavour while bringing a clear, clean taste to the palate. “One should be able to taste each, individual spice, whether it’s the cilantro, mint, chilies or whatever.” The fine balance found in the food is reflected in the restaurant’s modern mandate. Young chef Adil sees to that.


Situated in the heart of Rodney Bay, Spice of India is a bastion for both tourists and locals who crave familiar Indian dishes with a modern, sophisticated twist. Take, for example, the liver fry masala with tamarind and mango. “This dish is a tribute to my mother,” says the chef. “She was such a huge influence on me. I used to watch her cook this very dish for breakfast. I learnt as much as I could from her.”


Mom would be proud. According to the chef, the appetizer is currently among the most popular items on the menu. Adding to the popularity is Spice of India’s fine-dining look with an unabashed nod to Indian décor. Chef Sherwani says guests love the Indian silks, murals, and myriad bangles adorning the bar. “Regulars refer to it as the Bangle Bar,” he proudly says. The majority of his regular guests are locals, and British and Canadian tourists looking for a familiar taste of home. But most surprising, according to Sherwani, are all of the French guests flocking in to help fill the 100-seat restaurant for both lunch and supper service.


LIVER FRY MASALA Chicken Liver 150 grams


Chopped Red Onions 1 small Onion Chopped Garlic Chopped Cilantro Shredded Ginger Lime Juice


1 Bulb 1 Tsp


1 ½ Tsp


Cumin Seeds Garam Masala Chili Powder Brown Sugar Gram Flour


Dry Mango Powder


Few drops A pinch A pinch


Depends on how hot you want it 1 Tsp


1 small Bowl


(also known as Besan—available in Indian stores) Tamarind paste


2 Tsp 1 Tsp


(also known as Amchur—available in Indian stores) Sesame Seeds


A pinch Baywalk Mall, Rodney Bay | T: (758) 458 4243 W: spiceofindiastlucia.com LBH 2012 | 77


Marinate the bite size chicken liver with lime juice, garlic, chili powder, garam masala, besan flour and keep aside for an hour.


Dust the liver in dry besan and deep fry it for a minute in hot oil to ensure that it stays crisp outside and soft inside.


In a separate pan, crackle the cumin seeds in hot oil, add the rest of the ingredients and toss the liver. Make sure that it is tossed quickly on high flame so that no moisture oozes out.


It should be slightly dry and saucy. Sprinkle toasted sesame seeds and chopped cilantro and serve immediately.


“We were quite surprised at how popular the food is with the French, many of whom come from Martinique, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. We even translated our menu, so when they’re given our French menus it’s like, ‘wow!’ They’re really impressed.” The French aren’t the only diners leaving impressed. According to Tripadvisor.com, Spice of India has been ranked the number-one restaurant on St. Lucia.


But without a doubt, the most appreciated aspect at Spice of India is the open kitchen. “People love to just stand and watch our cooks at work. They are amazed by the flurry of action. Of course, the tandoor oven is a highlight for our guests.” No wonder. After all, this is where Adil and his team not only bake their famous Naan, they also make a total of eight (eight!) other specialty breads, from the stuffed Aloo Paratha to whole-wheat tandoori roti. “I love to watch the people watching us,” says the chef. “We love to cook and we want the people to see that and enjoy our food.”


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