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EAR TO THE GROUND • Becky Silverton


Preserving Britain’s industrial heritage...


Rutherford, Cartwright, Telford and numerous others, it’s a little less clear what we’ll be able to look back on in the future from the era we live in today. Is our industrial heritage something worth protecting – not simply so we have something to look back on with a warming sense of nostalgia, but so we have something to build on to assure a prosperous future? Is there, indeed, any future at all for engineering and manufacturing in this country, or have we simply lost the will and the desire for an industrial heartland? Well, the UK could be the


W


‘workshop of the world’, according to new research. The new ‘Annual Attitudes to UK Industry’ survey


shows that British adults do see the value of the country’s industrial heritage. The majority think it’s still just as important as ever and that we could be a ‘workshop of the world’. There is no doubt that some still see


manufacturing and engineering as low-skilled sectors. But as many as eight in ten say that manufacturing and industry should be given even


hile we can look back proudly on an industrial past across a range of industries, inspired by the likes of Brunel, Stephenson, Babbage,


greater importance and that the skills associated with industry are critical to the future of the workforce. The research, conducted among 2,000 adults by Populus for industrial communications firm CadenceFisher, also found that just over seven in ten adults (72%) believe that realigning the economy to achieve a greater balance between the contribution of the industrial and service sectors is key to helping the country out of debt. CadenceFisher’s CEO Dan Doherty explained:


“There are many positive messages that come through loud and clear. It’s also apparent though that industry needs to continue to clear up misconceptions that engineering and manufacturing are largely low-skilled sectors. Too few people surveyed said they would actively encourage people to work in the sector, and we need to elevate industry’s status if we are to achieve the rebalance that many commentators say we need for our economic revival.” The ‘Annual Attitudes to UK Industry’ study will


be a series of snapshot polls and in-depth research culminating in an annual report to be presented at an industry event. CadenceFisher works with leading organisations across industry and has sponsored the study’s launch to help keep communications surrounding the sector’s importance and contribution to the economy front of mind. More information is available at www.attitudestoukindustry.co.uk.


Instrumentation Scotland September 5-6, 2012 Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre www.instrumentation.co.uk Trident Exhibitions (01822 614671)


Sensing Technology September 25-26, 2012 NEC, Birmingham www.sensingtechnology.co.uk Trident Exhibitions (01822 614671)


Engineering Subcontractor October 18, 2012 National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham www.engsubshow.com Newbycom (01844 352916)


Aero Engineering November 7-8, 2012 NEC, Birmingham http://aeroconf.com UK Tech Events (0208 783 3574)


SPS/IPC/Drives November 27-29, 2012 Nuremburg, Germany www.mesago.de/en/SPS/home.htm Mesago Messe Frankfurt (+49 711 61946-0)


Sensors + Systems March 20-21, 2013 The Trafford Centre, Manchester www.sensorsandsystems.co.uk Trident Exhibitions (01822 614671)


Southern Manufacturing February 13-14, 2013 Five, Farnborough www.industry.co.uk ETES (01784 880892)


Index to Advertisers


Abssac ..................................................... 26 Access Electrical Services ........................... 41 Air Control Industries ................................. 13 Albert Jagger ............................................. 20 Albert Jagger ............................................. 23 Associated Spring ...................................... 20 B&R Automation ......................................... 7 Balluff ...................................................... 43 Brevini ..................................................... 35 Brownell ................................................... 13 Control Techniques ...................................... 5 EMS ......................................................... 33 ETA Enclosures (UK) .................................... 3 Festo ........................................................ 31


50


George Emmott (Pawsons) .......................... 19 Gold and Wassall ....................................... 23 Kistler ...................................................... 45 Lafert Electric Motors ................................. 29 Lee Products ............................................... 9 Machinery Safety Alliance ........................... 46 Maxon Motor UK ....................................... 15 Medway Power Transmission ...................... 37 Mitutoyo ................................................... 39 Ondrives ................................................... 36 Pennine Industrial Equipment ....................... 2 Poppelmann Plastics UK .............................. 9 Reliance Precision ..................................... 36


July 2012


Reliance Precision ..................................... 52 Rittal ........................................................ 24 Rotaflow FV .............................................. 47 Rotalink .................................................... 31 Spirol Industries .......................................... 9 Steute ...................................................... 15 Tandler Precision ....................................... 37 TFC .......................................................... 21 Trident Exhibitions ..................................... 41 Trident Exhibitions ..................................... 43 TÜV SÜD Product Service .......................... 47 Vero Technologies ...................................... 23 Wittenstein ............................................... 35


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY • July 2012


becky@itmagazine.uk.com


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