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The


Lion King


Amazing, awe-inspiring, absolutely stunning – words aren’t enough to describe this incredible show performed night after night at the Lyceum Theatre in London’s Covent Garden. One of Disney’s best-loved animations of all time transforms right in front of your eyes into a theatrical delight. The Lion King is the story of a young cub who is made an outcast by his ruthless uncle, and his subsequent journey to fulfill his destiny as king. It’s a vigorous blend of love, comedy and tragedy, with voices to die for, amazing African instruments and sensational choreography. It will have you right up on your feet.


Flavour is very excited to meet with cast members Kella Panay and Aaron Morgan to find out what all the roar is about...


How did you both get started in the world of performing? Kella: I was three when I started dancing and that was mainly because I loved the leotard, but my mum told me I had to do the dancing as well in order to get the leotard


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[laughs]. And I have carried on since then. I left home at 14 to come to London and study, and at 16 I went to the English National Ballet School and London Studio Centre. Aaron: I started dancing when I was seven. It was more of an accident for me. I went with my mum to an audition my sister was going for and she needed a partner – I actually turned out to be better than her [laughs].


What training did you have to do? K: In college I use to do ballet every morning, into a jazz class into contemporary, singing and drama. A: As Kella said, when you go to stage school you’re kind of expected to do everything.


Why musical theatre? K: When I left college I immediately started auditioning for musicals and my first show I got was Bombay Dreams; from there I did Saturday Night Fever and just continued with it. Musical theatre was always something I wanted to do because it’s a bit of everything, so you have to be good at it all really.


What it takes to be part of this ruling West End show. Hear its roar!


A: I did a show when I was in my second year of college and that’s what really made me decide I wanted to do musicals. I enjoy being able to act, dance and sing all in one show.


What was the audition experience like for The Lion King? K: For me it was very different to other musical auditions that I had been to before, because at The Lion King they do contemporary routine before you even learn anything from the show – which usually in auditions, that’s what they do first. But with The Lion King they teach you a contemporary piece to see how you perform, and then that’s where the first cut happens, and if you’re lucky enough to get through that, then you go on to doing parts of the musical. It is a very long process, but out of all the auditions that I’ve gone to it was my most enjoyable because it is really fun – it’s like being in a dance class. A: I usually hate the audition process, but like Kella said, it was like doing a class. It’s very nerve- racking, especially having 14, 15 people watch; but it definitely is fun.


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