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Greenwich Visitor THE


August 2012 Page 20 late night shopping I 3 hours free parking I high street brands Greenwich


Shopping Park simply stress-free shopping


THE


GREAT BRITISH ARTY PARTY


Delight the kids with FREE children’s entertainment from 12-3pm on


Monday 20 August at Clarks


own bunting, flags and crowns


Make your


CROWN MATRIMONIAL: ALEXANDRA PLAYERS


Matriarch & matrimony


YOU’D never have thought that a posh bloke with a stutter would make big box office. But in The King’s Speech, Colin Firth tapped into a g-gold mine of possibilities. The clincher was that the film


made the Royal Family seem so normal, so tarnished with the same insecurities as the rest of us. And in disrobing the very notion of Royal elevation, Charlton’s Alexandra Players made a great fist of the other side of the coin in Crown Matrimonial. The Royce Ryton-penned play explored Bertie’s ma Mary’s dilemma in letting her wee boy disgrace the royal court by finding happiness with interloper Wallis Simpson. The group’s very own matriarch


Janet Sweet was a no-brainer for the lead – she made of a plethora of lines and stern looks.


Keith Hartley has cemented his position as regular show-stealer, and here again his timing was as precise as a military salute. Liz Moss as Mary’s confident the Countess of Airlie put in a solid shift, and Queenie’s boudoir set was a work of art.


@ShopGSP greenwichshoppingpark.co.uk Greenwich Shopping Park


The production did miss the humour the Players have built their reputation on, but it was refreshing to see an am-dram group pushing the dram side of their repertoire. ANGUS JOHNSTONE


KNIVES IN HENS: GREENWICH THEATRE


Miller’s tale needs pace


KNIVES In Hens at Greenwich Theatre was a curious parable about the power of knowledge in rural England during the Age of the Enlightenment when near- illiterate peasants lived in fear of God, the Devil and magic. David Harrower’s three-hander was beautifully acted by Jennifer Greenwood and Simon Victor as a pair of benightedly ignorant villagers whose lives are turned upside down by an educated miller, played by Isaac Stanmore. The miller’s learning turns Greenwood’s character from a superstitious bigot into someone desperate for knowledge and love – so desperate, in fact, that she helps him murder her husband. The excellent acting was aided and abetted by moody lighting cleverly designed by Owain Davies. The only sour note was to be found in the pacing of the play. The wife’s transformation from dimwit to wannabe intellectual who was prepared to kill to achieve enlightenment was simply too quick – we could have done with another scene or three to build dramatic tension. That said, this production was never less than absorbing. It’s to Greenwich Theatre’s credit they were prepared to stage something so unusual. MILES HEDLEY


Monday 30th July - Friday 3rd August Kids’ Sports Week


l 11 - 12 pm Fun Games & Races l 1 - 3 pm Sporting Workshops


Saturday 4th 11am-9pm & Sunday 5th August 11am-5pm


1948 Festival Fête l


l Live Bands & Performances l Market Place


l Pop Up Art Gallery


l Beauty & Well Being Zone l Food & Drink


East Greenwich Pleasaunce, Greenwich, SE10 OLB


Email: egcfest@gmail.com #EGCFest


l Vintage Tea & Games Tent l Hog Roast & Beer


eastgreenwichcommunityfestivals Group: East Greenwich Community Festivals


Cake Competition l Fun Dog Show l Kids Disco


l Children’s Workshops


l ‘1940s’ Best Dressed Competition l


Open Air Church Service & lots more...


To hire a stall, perform, enter a competition or volunteer email: egcfest@gmail.com


Info: www.streamarts.org.uk/projects/egcf Sign Up: www.bit.ly/egcfsign


The EGCF is a project


of STREAM ARTS LTD a registered charity in England No 1080909


Summer 2012


British arts & crafts


Best of


Come along!


music and fun


Bubbles,


THEATRE


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