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man’s suit can provide a window to his very soul, making a statement about who he is, or who he wants to be. A navy blue, double-breasted pinstripe is


revered by the Establishment. It’s a modern day suit of armour, understated elegance oozing from every seam, commanding respect as it sails down the corridors of power. That’s in stark contrast to a short, closely fitted Mohair blazer, falling out of a club at 4am, Gran Patron tequila still dribbling down the chin of its owner. Suits and tailors often have a wonderful


The Dandy is back


Yorkshire’s favourite tailor James Michelsberg celebrates the fact more and more young men of today are ditching the sports casual look for a finer dapper look.


Photography by Chris Thompson / www.brokenclockphotographic.com R


emember the days when sports labels were king? Disco’s thumped to


Madonna’s ‘La Isla Bonita,’ as teenagers furtively pawed at each other, wearing Sergio Tacchini tracksuits and neon pink spandex. How times change. Last


Saturday night, I watched four young lads cross the road like a scene from Reservoir Dogs. Dressed in black suits, white shirts and skinny ties they laid testament to the fact that the Dandy is back. Sharp threads breed confidence


and like giants they swaggered past a group of shouty, red- faced Wetherspooners, shirts un-tucked, wobbling into a ‘Gentleman’s Club’ for early- doors titillation.


Whilst the wheel of fashion continues to spin, dapper remains very much the done thing and that’s great for bespoke tailoring. Cool young things in pointed shoes, skinny jeans and Frodo haircuts are jumping onto the good ship slick and for good reason.


A suit can bring gravitas, sex


appeal. It can make you look taller, slimmer and add an air of mystery. The cloth and cut of a


history behind them, enriched further by the high profile personalities who have embraced them to help develop and shape their own personal style. Iconic photographs such as Winston


Churchill posing with a Tommy gun in a grey pinstripe by Henry Poole, or Mick Jagger in a white Tommy Nutter three piece, drinking Champagne in the back of his wedding car have been immortalised forever. By wearing a certain style, or patronising a


tailoring house, you immediately become part of the club, a tribe of like-minded individuals with a shared ‘uniform’ and values. David Beckham, Daniel Craig, P Diddy, Paul


Weller and Brett Anderson all owe a nod of thanks to the clothes on their back for helping them influence the way they are perceived by others. To many youngsters, they are people to look up to, even emulate, and by wearing a similar get-up, they might hope to win a bit of that persons ‘je ne sais quoi.’ Speaking personally, as a teenager in my


silver two piece suit, sleeves rolled up above the elbows and massive shoulder pads, I was Yorkshire’s answer to Don Johnson from Miami Vice. Happy days! Waistcoats, velvet collars and dressing-up to the nines will always be the heart and soul of Michelsberg tailoring. I thank my lucky stars that for the moment, ‘The Suit’ is in Vogue but acknowledge that fashion is a fickle lady and the party can’t last forever. Perhaps I should start planning a range of


slouchy knitwear and sports-clobber now before the wheel turns too far? Sod that. I’d rather go bust.


Michelsberg Tailoring, 24A Queen Victoria Street, Victoria Quarter, Leeds, LS1 6BE Tel: 0113 242 0840 Web: www.michelsberg.co.uk


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