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which are unique to the company, are the most popular; things like Humbugs, Lemon Sherbets and Rhubarb & Custard.


What is your personal favourite? My personal favourite would be our Mint Humbugs, which have a soft toffee centre.


The Cheddar Sweet Kitchen is famous for its traditional sweets. Do you ever launch new sweets and, if so, how are you inspired? Occasionally we launch new products. This is usually in response to changes in customers’


tastes.


horse and cart and he made sweets until the late 1970s. I came into the business in 1956 and have been there ever since.


Who else from the Mizen family is involved in the sweet factory today? We are now with the fifth generation


96 | ukhandmade | Summer 2012


of the Mizen family and the youngest is my 20 year-old grand-daughter, who is training to be a sweet maker. My wife and daughter are also involved in the business.


What is The Cheddar Sweet Kitchen’s best selling sweet? Our old fashioned sweets, many of


Very sour or very fizzy sweets, such as our Very Strong Acid Drops, made with no artificial colours or flavours are particularly popular at present. Fizzy Fishes, fish shaped sweets packed with sherbet powder, and Fizzy Sherbet Pips, tiny boiled sweets which fizz right through, from start to finish, are favourites with the children, whilst adults enjoy traditional Sherbet Lemons.


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