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Often it’s only a small amount that is needed to make a difference: $2,500 was enough to help Elizabeth get her film crew to Greece, £500 for Diana to take her artworks to local markets, and £2,800 for Sarah to go to Scoop. These relatively small sums are sometimes the hardest to muster.


Both Sarah and Diana knew they did not require the sort of money that would be provided by traditional investment and did not justify taking out risky loans. Some amounts might be small to investors, but for artists it’s the difference between making a film happen (or not), getting work to a broader audience or just getting that little extra boost to cement aspirations.


Elizabeth and Diana also found that there is another benefit to crowd funding – you can get an idea of how much interest there is in your work. To reach a funding target can be a priceless confidence boost.


69 | ukhandmade | Summer 2012


Image courtesy of Diana Parkhouse of www.badgersbadgers.co.uk


Pruning and Weeding: the Realism of Growth There may be less appeal to some investors as crowd funding is not part of the aegis of government protections. According to Reuters, the government’s tax breaks for backing new enterprises generally only apply if there is a conventional shareholding arrangement. Crowd funding


deliberately avoids this


sort of model because it often dilutes control. Nor are investors


necessarily covered by government compensation schemes, but given the small sums of money, there is very little risk to investors; further underscored by the fact that money may be returned if the target is not met. Effectively, there is a highly attractive, no-risk investment.


As for crowd funding services, Sarah found the “all or nothing” requirement slightly limiting, reasoning that any investment would be beneficial.


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