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July 7 – 20, 2012 www.SanTanSun.com


Price Rd. developer buys Kuiper Dairy Mixed emotions as city’s farm roots become history


BY CODY MATERA, ASU JOURNALISM STUDENT Bustling with sparkling new buildings,


Chandler’s Price Corridor near Willis Road boasts a Hilton Homewood Suites, Marriott Courtyard and Fairfield Inn & Suites, a Hampton Inn, an expansive eBay and PayPal office building, upscale housing developments, a wedding manor – and a stench emanating from a periodic festering manure lagoon. It’s the tale of big-box development


BATTER UP: CNLL All Star baseball player Brody Wagner, 10, a student at Riggs Elementary, keeps his eye on the ball indoors at Strike Zone Batting Cages in the Santan Gateway Plaza, 1315 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler. He and other local ball players can beat the heat and stay in shape. Strike Zone is offering clinics and camps this summer. Visit www.StrikeZoneAZ.com or call 602-644-1536 for details. STSN photo


Tax burden may halt short sales


BY ALISON STANTON During the past several years, the sight


of short-sale signs swinging in the breeze has become extremely commonplace throughout the East Valley. According to Jon Beydler, designated


broker and managing member for Valley of the Sun Real Estate in Chandler, chances are good that when this year’s holiday season rolls around, those signs will be less prominent. Beydler, who co-owns the real estate


company along with wife Cheryl, a Realtor and property manager, says if


the 2008 Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act is not extended after Dec. 31, short sales will quickly become an extremely unattractive option for sellers who are “underwater” in their homes, or they owe more than the house is worth. The 2008 Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act provideda an exemption from IRS capital gains taxes for underwater homeowners who short sold their homes, Beydler says. “Most underwater homeowners who


consider a short sale have always been concerned about the bank’s ability to


SEE Beydlers PAGE 6


versus family-owned dairy farm. It’s the suburban crossroads of two very different lifestyles that both delight the eye and assault the nose. “Our guests sometimes walk in at


night and they are in utter shock,” says Oscar Guevera, desk clerk at the Marriott Courtyard. “They say ‘what’s the horrible smell?’ We just apologize and say, ‘It’s the farm down the street.’ There’s not really anything else we can do but say we’re sorry.” Next door at the Fairfield Inn & Suites,


desk clerk Daisy Esparza has had similar experiences. “The smell is terrible sometimes in the morning and night, whenever what they are doing on the farm is fresh,” she explains, crinkling her nose. “Some of our guests like to go jogging or walking in the evening, and it bothers them a lot. But there’s nothing we can do. Fortunately, most of our guests go off to work during the day so they don’t have to endure it that much.” Esparza and Guevera don’t think the smell is hurting business to any significant degree, however. “Once people find out what it is, they


tend to understand,” Guevera says. “It’s a farm. It’s where we get our food. What’s interesting is that 80% of the guests have no idea what the smell is until they are told. Only about 20%, usually guests from the Midwest, say, ‘Oh, there’s a farm nearby?’ Those are the ones who don’t complain.”


SEE Price Road PAGE 8


PRICE OF PROGRESS: A farm family since 1975, the Kuipers expect to transition their Price Road land to developers by fall. STSN photo


Seton pins down world-class wrestling coach


BY K. M. LANG Eric Larkin’s wrestling career has taken him all over the globe, from Siberia in deep winter to the sunlit shores of Greece. Now, wrestling has brought the former national champion home to Arizona, where he’ll share his knowledge of the sport with a new generation of athletes at Chandler’s Seton Catholic Preparatory High School. Larkin started his career as a two-time


state champion at Tucson’s Sunnyside High School. While a student at Arizona State University, the four-time All American and Pac-10 champion earned the 2003 NCAA Division I National Championship at 149 pounds. Larkin


competed twice at the Olympic trials, and was a member of the U.S. wrestling team in 2000, 2004 and 2007, representing his country at matches around the globe. He went on to coach for ASU,


resigning after five years to spend more time with his wife, Melissa, and their growing family. It’s that same dedication to family that’s led the Gilbert resident back to the locker room. “I always told myself I wouldn’t coach again because I just really didn’t like the traveling,” explains Larkin. “I was done competing, myself, in 2008, and I stepped away from wrestling a little bit. My boys started wrestling again this past


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year, so I kind of started getting back into it, and I started getting the itch again to coach.” Larkin has five sons: Kaden, 10; Kaleb, 8; Kyler, 6; Konner, 3; and Kash, 1. The eldest three are involved in wrestling, and even the youngest seem primed to follow their father and brothers onto the mats. “My 3-year-old goes in and chases the


guys around,” Larkin says, chuckling. “That lasts about 10 minutes – his attention span doesn’t last very long. My 1-year-old gets in a wrestling stance, too.” Larkin’s little ones don’t yet know


it, but they’re carrying on a valued family tradition.


SEE Seton coach PAGE 10


COACH LARKIN: Wrestling champ Eric Larkin has signed on to coach the sport at Seton High, where he hopes to take the Sentinals to a state championship in five years – and teach his young wrestlers some valuable life lessons. “Wrestling helps you with self-discipline and working to reach goals,” says Larkin. “You learn not to give up, even when you do get knocked down.” STSN photo by Miachelle Depiano


F E AT U R E D S TO R I E S STSN to hold candidate forum . . . . . . . . . COMMUNITY . . . . . . Page 4 So Cute! offers affordable fashion . . . . . . BUSINESS . . . . . . . . Page 19 CUSD board to vote on budget . . . . . . . . . YOUTH . . . . . . . . . Page 26 State’s only olive mill in Queen Creek . . NEIGHBORS . . . . . . Page 45 ‘Big Playdate’ is a cool time . . . . . . . . . . . . SPIRITUALITY. . . . . . Page 56


SanTan Family Fun: Finding kid’s drug stash . . . .Center More


Community . . . . . . . . 4-18 Business . . . . . . . . . . 19-25 Youth. . . . . . . . . . . . .26-33 Opinion. . . . . . . . . . .34-36 Neighbors. . . . . . . . .45-55 Spirituality . . . . . . . .56-59 Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60-65 Directory . . . . . . . . 66-68 Classifieds. . . . . . . . 69-70 Where to eat . . . . . . 71-76


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