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THE BARCLAYS


Courses. The Black Course was legendary in the Met area but the world got its first look in 2002 when Tiger Woods out-dueled Phil Mickelson to win the U.S. Open by three strokes. In 2009, the Open returned to Bethpage and Lucas Glover beat Ricky Barnes, David Duval and Phil Mickelson— as well as the unrelenting rains—to win his first major championship.


A HELPING HAND The in


Barclays thousands of


makes lives


a by


difference providing


financial support to several non-profit organizations, primarily The First Tee of Metropolitan New York. The additional charitable donations vary according to the site of the tournament. The Barclays donated $1.5


million to charities in


2011—despite the horrendous weather— bringing the tournament’s total donations to roughly $35 million since 1967.


PHIL’S SECOND HOME Phil Mickelson is wildly popular in the


New York City area, in part because of his victory in the 2005 PGA Championship at Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, New Jersey, where he edged Thomas Bjorn and Steve Elkington by a stroke. New Yorkers love a winner, but part of Mickelson’s appeal stems from the way he conducted himself in not one, not two, but three dramatic losses. In 2002, he lost the Open to Tiger Woods by a stroke at Bethpage Black and then four years later at Winged Foot, with a double bogey on the final hole, he finished second again, this time to Australia’s Geoff Ogilvy. Then, in 2009 at Bethpage Black, he was runner-up for the fifth time in the national championship. Mickelson came to the PGA TOUR


after dominating the amateur ranks as few before or since. Through his induction into the World Golf Hall of Fame this May, he had won 40 TOUR events including the 2005 PGA Championship and three Masters, joining Jimmy Demaret, Sam Snead, Gary Player and Nick Faldo as


three-time champions. In 2007, he won THE PLAYERS Championship and then the TOUR Championship by Coca Cola in 2009—two of the TOUR’s most prestigious events. Mickelson and his wife, Amy, have


numerous charitable commitments, including the Special Operations Warrior Foundation, Homes for Our Troops and Birdies for the Brave. It is that sort of involvement that led to a long-running relationship with Barclays. “Phil is a great ambassador and role


model for the game of golf,” said Bob Diamond, Chief Executive, Barclays. “He is a winner who personifies golf’s values of integrity, focus and precision, which are at the core of how Barclays conducts its business for clients and customers.” Since Barclays became the tournament’s


title sponsor in 2005, six different players have won the event. Two were international players and there have been two playoffs.


A stroll down memory lane


2005: IT WAS PADRAIG HARRINGTON’S TIME After losing in a playoff to Spain’s Sergio Garcia in 2004, it appeared that Ireland’s Padraig Harrington was destined for another playoff, this time against Jim Furyk. On the final hole at Westchester Country Club, Harrington had a 65-footer he was trying to just get close enough to force extra holes. Instead, he ran it into the cup for an eagle and his second PGA TOUR victory.


2006: VIJAY SINGH WINS HIS THIRD AT WESTCHESTER Vijay Singh was the man to beat at Westchester Country Club, where he won his third Barclays in a battle with Australian Adam Scott. On Sunday, the two came to the 14th


78 PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012 www.pgatour.com 2005


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