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THE BARCLAYS


2016. We’re still in discussions for sites after that but we’ll stay in the Met area. It’s been great for us and for the fans.


DW: Last year made your job interesting to say the least. PM: Dealing with the weather is part of the job but, seriously, a hurricane in New Jersey? I’ve never seen weather that severe. You hate to call it off after 54 holes, but we didn’t have a choice. The grounds crew did an unbelievable job but there wasn’t any way to get the course in playable condition. I mean, the governors of New York and New Jersey declared states of emergency. It was such a helpless feeling knowing that there wasn’t anything we could do. I felt badly for the fans and especially for Plainfield’s members. They were so proud of the brilliant renovation Gil Hanse did for them.


DW: How does being a part of the PGA TOUR Playoffs for the FedExCup work for your tournament? PM: It really is great. It adds such an element of drama. First of all, I’ll tell you who the Playoffs really help: the Wyndham Championship the week before us. You have a lot of guys playing there trying to make the top 125 and get into our field. You also have players who are in the top 125 but want to build up as many points as they can in case they miss our cut. They still have to stay around and see if they get in the field in Boston. Plus, it’s great for the fans. They really love the Playoffs atmosphere.


DW: How is your working relationship with Barclays? PM: I think they’re the best title sponsors on TOUR. Bob Diamond (Barclays’ chief executive officer) is a great guy with a great family and he really believes in the tournament and what we’re trying to do and Patrick O’Riordan, the director of sports marketing, is wonderful to work with. They don’t look at the tournament just in terms of what it can do for them and their clients. They’re concerned about the fans, the clubs, the players and the charities. They go out of their way to help with the players, CBS and Golf Channel, the wives, the fans


www.pgatour.com


Phil Mickelson has a business relationship with Barclays.


PM: He’s like an ambassador for us. He was very supportive even before he became involved with Barclays. He and his agent, Steve Loy, are very helpful. He’s incredibly popular in the area and he always commits early, which helps us in promoting the tournament.


in a lot of ways that never get any publicity. And they do it without micromanaging.


DW: Phil Mickelson has a business relationship with Barclays. How important is that for the tournament?


A LOOK AT BETHPAGE BLACK Bethpage Black is one of architect A.W. Tillinghast’s greatest designs, which is saying a lot since the man also designed such U.S. Open venues as Winged Foot’s West Course, Baltusrol’s Lower Course, just to drop a couple of names. It is the crown jewel of the four-course public facility at Bethpage State Park on Long Island. In the 1930s, the Bethpage Park


Authority purchased the existing Lenox Hills Country Club and commissioned Tillinghast to modify the course, which became known as the Green Course, as well as create the Black, Red and Blue


« BY GOING TO A ROTATION IT GAVE US A CHANCE TO PLAY ON SOME OF THE OTHER GREAT COURSES IN THE MET AREA—AND THERE ARE A LOT OF THEM. » - Peter Mele


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012 77


Peter Mele, The Barclays Executive Director.


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