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DID YOU KNOW? The Tudor-style East Lake Golf Club clubhouse is a testament to the storied career of Bobby Jones. Jones’ family had a home adjacent to the current 10th fairway, enabling a young Jones to quickly run to the course where he learned the game from club professional Stewart Maiden.


Tiger Woods and Phil


Victories:


Mickelson (2)


The clubhouse


overlooks the body of water called East Lake and rests between the two nines, including the adjacent difficult, uphill par-3 18th hole on the Donald Ross-designed course. Inside the clubhouse is a museum focused on


Jones and his East Lake brethren who made the club so famous, as well as the events that have been held here over the years. There are numerous artifacts celebrating Jones’ career located in The Great Hall. The Havemeyer Trophy, given to the winner of the U.S. Amateur, is here. The original trophy was lost in a 1925 East Lake clubhouse fire, but the United States Golf Association designed a new trophy that is still in use today. A replica was produced in 1996 for placement at East Lake. Jones’ Grand Slam trophies from 1930 (U.S. Amateur and Open and British Amateur and Open) are represented by replicas. The new clubhouse was designed in 1926 by noted Atlanta architect Philip Shutze, who constructed some of Atlanta’s most elegant homes and buildings, with a large addition completed in 2008.


Throughout the clubhouse are rare golf pieces. Official memorabilia from the 1963 Ryder Cup, held at East Lake, is on display in the Bobby Jones Room. The Grill Room houses a complete set of solid wood hole signs that were in use until the club’s renovation in 1993. The Watts Gunn Room features a newspaper scrapbook from the 1925 U.S. Amateur where Jones beat fellow East Lake member Gunn in the final. This marked the only time that two members from the same club met in the final of the U.S. Amateur.


The winner of the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola receives a Calamity Jane sterling silver commemorative putter, an exact replica


196 PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012


Most


of Jones’ original putter. Jones received the original Calamity Jane in 1920 and used that model to capture 13 major championships. Jones’ original gray locker is on display in the golf shop. Jones’ locker—actually a double locker bearing Nos. 690 and 691— holds Jones’ clubs, shoes and other


items. The locker was made for Jones by the East Lake membership in honor of the 1930 Grand Slam. n


Course Insight


Charity Link Since 1998, the TOUR Championship has donated


more than $11 million to charity, both locally and nationwide. The money raised primarily benefits the East Lake Foundation and The First Tee.The East Lake Foundation has helped transform one of the nation’s worst public housing projects into a thriving community. The Foundation is a key component in the First Tee of East Lake and the par-58 Charlie Yates Golf Course, both located across Alston Drive from East Lake Golf Club.


East Lake Golf Club


Here’s some golf history: What are the odds that both Bobby Jones and Alexa Stirling would learn the game from East Lake’s


Scottish-born professional, Stewart


Maiden? Jones was one of the game’s greatest champions and almost certainly its greatest amateur. Fittingly, East Lake was where he played his final round of golf before his body began to seriously deteriorate from syringomyelia. Sterling won the most important United States women’s championship of the time, the U.S. Women’s Amateur, in 1916, 1919 and 1920.


East Lake hosted the TOUR Championship by Coca-Cola for the first time in 1998, when Hal Sutton won, and today it is the tournament’s permanent home. One of the course’s appeals is that its home hole is a longish par 3, which is an oddity but often adds great excitement to the final round of the championship.


Tournament Record 257, Tiger Woods, 2007


Tournament 18-Hole Record 60, Zach Johnson, 2007


GOLF CHANNEL • NBC


Ticket Information www.pgatour.com/ tournaments/r060


www.pgatour.com


© PG A TOUR/ CHRIS CONDON/ STAN BADZ


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