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the championship. Lionel Hebert won the championship


in 1957, the


last time it was contested at match play. His brother, Jay, a decorated Marine Corps veteran in World War II, won in 1960, and today the Heberts remain the only brothers to have won the championship.


Victories: Walter Hagen and


Most


Jack Nicklaus (5)


WELCOME TO THE MEDAL-PLAY ERA The decision to switch from match to medal play was controversial at the time, and many people questioned the PGA of America’s decision. Many still do. In truth, the increasing influence of television was a large part of the equation. Match play is great for the television if you happen to have a final featuring two of the game’s heroes, but the truth is that due to the unpredictability of match play, the best players do not always survive to reach the final, and that is generally reflected in the ratings. In fairness, however, the players who have


won the title since the switch are the type that would likely have won in either format: Jack Nicklaus won five times, and other multiple winners include Gary Player, Raymond Floyd, Dave Stockton, Lee Trevino, Larry Nelson, Nick Price, Vijay Singh and Tiger Woods, who won his fourth title in 2007.


REMEMBER THIS? Winning a major championship can either be a verification of greatness or an indication of great things to come. Keegan Bradley’s win in last year’s PGA Championship convinced a lot of people—even the most cynical observers— that it might well be the latter. Bradley, a reformed skier and the nephew of


World Golf Hall of Fame member Pat Bradley, was five strokes back with only three holes to play after his chip shot raced across the 15th green and into the water, leading to a triple bogey. If there is a certain mental toughness in the Bradley family genes, it was on display in the minutes that followed. “I just kept telling myself, ‘Don’t let that hole define this whole tournament,’ ” Bradley said later. Bradley went on and toughed out back-to- back birdies, including a 35-footer on the 17th.


JASON DUFNER STRUGGLES Jason Dufner, who had been so steady in the final round, found the water with his tee shot


170 PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012


on the 15th for the first of three straight bogeys that led to a three-hole,


cumulative score


playoff. Bradley, a 25-year-old rookie who had already won earlier in the year at the HP Byron Nelson Championship, birdied the first hole of the playoff—No. 16—to take the solo lead for the first time on Sunday, and held on to win by one stroke, becoming only the third player in at least 100 years to win a major championship in his first try.


“It feels unbelievable,” he said. “It seems like a dream and I’m afraid I’m going to wake up here in the next five minutes and it’s not going to be real.


“I don’t want to be one of the guys that kind of disappears. I would love to be up in a category with the best players and be mentioned with Phil Mickelson, one of my idols. I hope I don’t disappear. I don’t plan to.” ■


ca How Was It Won?


Keegan Bradley combined power and accuracy to with the PGA Championship.


■ He ranked eighth in Driving Distance (301.8 yards). ■ He tied for 20th in Driving Accuracy (62.5 percent).


■ He was second in Greens in Regulation (77.8 percent).


■ He was second in putts on Greens Hit in Regulation Putts (1.679).


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Since 1916, the PGA of America has served the golf public, working with golf course owners and golf manufacturers through its


efforts to promote the game and make it accessible to everyone,


everywhere. These efforts are carried out by the more than 28,000 men


and women PGA


professionals who make the PGA of America the


world’s largest working sports organization.


The PGA, in 1978, created a public philanthropic foundation, which later became known as The PGA Foundation. In keeping with the mission of the PGA of America, the foundation is dedicated to providing resources, professional expertise and programs to make golf accessible to all segments of the population.


The PGA Foundation’s priority is to grow the game of golf while using the game to enhance the quality of life for all people, especially for those who are under-served by the game. Directly associated with golf programs are core values such as honesty, integrity, respect, self-assurance, courtesy, and perseverance.


PLAYER


FINAL STANDINGS ROUNDS


POS 1


Keegan Bradley Jason Dufner


Anders Hansen Robert Karlsson David Toms


Scott Verplank Adam Scott


Lee Westwood Luke Donald Kevin Na


D.A. Points


1 2


3


T4 T4


T4 7


T8 T8


T10 2 3


71 64 69 70 65 68


68 69 70 70 71


67


72 71 65 67 69 69


69 69 70 71 68 70 70 71 68 72 69 70


T10 69 67 71 4


68 69


66 67 67


70 68 68 68 67 71


TOTAL SCORE


272 272


273 275 275


275 276 277 277 278 278


OFFICIAL MONEY $1,445,000


$865,000 $545,000 $331,000 $331,000


$331,000 $259,000 $224,500 $224,500 $188,000 $188,000


FEDEXCUP POINTS


600 330


-


126 126


126 100 -


91 79 79


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