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of the putting surface. Suddenly they were tied and the game was on—for the time being, at least. Perez bogeyed the par-4 17th when he missed an eight-footer for par. Piercy hit his drive 387 yards on the 616-yard downhill 18th onto another cart path, played safely out, and then pitched to 30 feet and two- putted for the win, his first in 91 starts. “Yeah, 30 feet and two-putting is not as easy as it looks sometimes,” said Piercy. “Coming down the stretch, you know, making pars is sometimes as good as making birdies.”


1 With his victory,


Scott Piercy became the first Nevada


native to win in the


13-year history of the Reno-Tahoe Open.


Charity Link Since 1999, Northern Nevada charities


have benefited from the tournament, with more than $1.8 million donated by the Reno-Tahoe Open Foundation. As in years past, the key recipient will be the Nevada Military Support Alliance. The NMSA is designed to provide support and coordinated integration to all Nevadans who have served or are presently serving in the


U.S. military at a level that has not been achieved until today. The NMSA works with all aspects of the military to identify gaps in service and creates the bridges to close those gaps.


FORMAT REVIVED AT RENO-TAHOE The Reno-Tahoe Open is switching to a modified Stableford scoring system in 2012 in an effort to encourage aggressive play. The 14th annual PGA TOUR event will be the


only tournament on TOUR to use the system, which awards points for birdies and eagles and deducts points for bogeys and worse. ■


How Was It Won? Scott Piercy won the Reno-Tahoe Open with a


combination of power and accuracy. ■ He was 13th in Driving Distance (330.3). ■ He was tied for fifth in Greens in Regulation (52 of 72—72.2 percent).


■ He was 10th in Strokes-Gained Putting (6.066). Powered by Course Insight


Montreux Golf & Country Club


PLAYER


FINAL STANDINGS ROUNDS


POS 1


Scott Piercy Pat Perez


Blake Adams Steve Flesch Jim Renner


Steve Elkington Ben Martin


Matt McQuillan Nick O’Hern Hunter Haas Billy Horschel Michael Letzig Bryce Molder


www.pgatour.com


1 2


T3 T3 5


T6 T6 T6 T6


T10 T10 T10 T10


2 72 70 3 61


73 68 65 67 72


67


68 69 70 74 69 65 73 65 68 68 72 68 71 69 71 65 72 69 70 67 72 71 70


70


70 69 70 72 71 68


4


70 68


69 68 68 71 69 66 71 69 67 69 67


TOTAL SCORE


273 274


275 275 276 277 277 277 277 278 278 278 278


OFFICIAL MONEY $540,000


$324,000 $174,000 $174,000 $120,000 $97,125 $97,125 $97,125 $97,125 $69,000 $69,000 $69,000 $69,000


FEDEXCUP POINTS


250.00 150.00


82.50 82.50 55.00 44.50 44.50 44.50 44.50 32.70 32.70 32.70 32.70


This stunning course was ranked as the third- best new private course by Golf Digest in 1988. It was designed by Jack Nicklaus, who counts it among his finest designs and certainly one of the most beautiful. Nicklaus made great efforts to preserve as many trees as possible as he routed the holes through thick stands of towering pines, while taking every opportunity to provide stunning views of Mount Rose, and his efforts were praised by local environmentalists. The course is highlighted by creeks, seven lakes, four waterfalls, and challenging changes in elevation. During the tournament, the front and back nines are reversed. A flood destroyed No. 8 in 1997, which had to be rebuilt the following year. In 2002, three additional holes were added to the course to the right of No. 15. These replaced the previous Nos. 10, 11 and 12, which had more of a high desert open design. The signature stretch of holes is the “Bear Trap,” Nos. 15, 16 and 17, where the tournament can easily be won or lost.


Tournament Record 267, Vaughn Taylor, 2005


Tournament 18-Hole Record 61, Scott Piercy, 2011


GOLF CHANNEL Ticket Information


www.renotahoeopen. com


PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012 165


© GETTY IMAGES/ EZRA SHAW/ JONATHAN FERREY


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