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June 22-24


Montreal Championship Presented by Desjardins


EVEN FROM AN EARLY AGE, there were high expectations for John Cook, and he managed to live up to them. He was recruited to play golf for Ohio State


University by Jack Nicklaus and Tom Weiskopf and he had a great career there, winning All-America honors three times, and was a key member of the 1979 NCAA Championship team. He won the 1978 U.S. Amateur Championship, beating Scott Hoch to win the country’s most prestigious amateur title. He won 11 times on the PGA TOUR and came out on the Champions Tour in 2007, winning five times before the 2011 season. Cook got off to a fast start in 2011, winning the season-opening


Mitsubishi Electric


Championship in Hawaii in January and topped Jay Don Blake in a playoff in the Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am in Florida in April. He picked up his third win of the year at the Montreal Championship presented by Desjardins and he did it in impressive fashion, shooting a tournament-record 195 to beat Taiwan’s Chien Soon Lu by three strokes. Joey Sindelar (a teammate at Ohio State) was third at 17 under, and Bill Glasson, Corey Pavin and Dan Forsman (68) were tied for fourth. Canadian Rod Spittle broke the course record with a 62 to finish at 15-under par. “I thought 20 would have a good chance,” Cook said. “I got off to a great start and that kind of let me


John Cook picked up his third title in 2011 at the Fontainebleau Golf Club.


then relax a little bit and go ahead and free swing it because 20 was my number that I thought I was going to be close and have a chance, maybe, a playoff, so all day I was thinking that. Once I got to 20, I wanted to get to 21. “To win coming from behind and win from being ahead, it’s two different animals, really,” said Cook. “Mr. Lu did a nice job and he kind of got things going on the back side there and made some beautiful birdies coming down the stretch. He just battled all day and he wasn’t giving up.” His impressive finish was particularly encouraging for Spittle since he began the round in a tie for 49th. “I expect to win sometimes this year and this is just a great boost of confidence,” Spittle said. ■


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


Tom Lehman Nick Price


Tom Watson John Cook Peter Senior David Eger Mark Wiebe Michael Allen Jeff Sluman


Loren Roberts www.pgatour.com


EVENTS 11 12 6


12 11 12 11 10 13 10


POINTS 1,533 1,053 850 830 717 705 662 623 529 501


480 683 703 816 828 871 910


1,004 1,032


3 1 1 3 -


1 1 - - -


11 12 6


LaVallée du Richelieu Golf Club (Verchères Course) (Par 72/6,950 yards) Montreal, Quebec, Canada


Course Insight LaVallée du


Richelieu Golf Club


Located 30 minutes from downtown Montreal in the city of Ste-Julie, La Vallée du Richelieu Golf Club offers golfers two 18-hole championship golf courses (Verchères and Rouville). Originally designed by William F. Gordon in 1965, the 6,950-yard, par-72 Verchères


layout recently


underwent extensive renovations. It has played host to a pair of Canadian Open Championships (1971 and 1973) along with the 1994 Skins Game and the 1999 Canadian Senior Open. La Vallée du Richelieu was also the site of the


POINTS BEHIND WINS TOP 10 -


12 11 12 11 10 13 10


“TO WIN COMING FROM BEHIND AND WIN FROM BEING AHEAD, IT’S TWO DIFFERENT ANIMALS, REALLY.” – John Cook


1999 Canada Senior Open Championship, where Monday qualifier Jim Ahern defeated Hale Irwin in a playoff.


Tournament Record 195, John Cook, 2011


Tournament 18-Hole Record 62, Rod Spittle, 2011


GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information www.


montrealchampionship.com PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012 133


© GETTY IMAGES/ MICHAEL COHEN


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