This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
June 14-17 U.S. Open The Olympic Club


Lake Course (Par 70/7,060 yards) San Francisco, California


Youth didn’t stop Rory McIlroy from a remarkable win at the 2011 U.S. Open.


THE FIRST U.S. OPEN was played in 1895 among the society swells at Newport Country Club, Rhode Island, who, frankly, were more interested in the U.S. Amateur, which had been played a few days earlier. It was won by Horace Rawlins, a 21-year-old Englishman and the club’s assistant pro, who fired a 173 for 36 holes. For his efforts, he pocketed $150. It is not recorded whether he got the rest of the day off or went back to cleaning clubs. Scots and Englishmen dominated the early


years of the Open, but in 1913, 20-year-old Francis Ouimet made headlines across the country by winning. Ouimet grew up across the street from The Country Club in Brookline, MA, and learned the game there as a caddie. He stunned the golf world by beating two of the best players in the game’s history, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray, in a playoff. Like every other aspect of the sport he personified, Bobby Jones dominated the Open, winning the championship four times before retiring from competitive play in 1930, the year he won the four major championships of the day, the


124 PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012


“I think this kid is going to have a great career. He has a lot of people rooting for him. He’s humble when he ought to be and confident when he


needs to be.” – Jack Nicklaus on Rory McIlroy


U.S. and British Opens and Amateurs. Beginning in the late 1930s through the 1950s,


American golf was dominated by Ben Hogan, Sam Snead and Byron Nelson—and Hogan was the supreme “Open Player” of his time. His brilliant course management, steely determination and meticulous shotmaking led to four U.S. Open victories. Nelson won the Open in 1939 and was runner-up in 1946, while Snead never won the Open, finishing second four times. Arnold Palmer’s victories and defeats were


equally dramatic and the public loved him for it. One of his greatest wins came in the 1960 U.S. Open at Cherry Hills, where he shot a final-round 65 to beat Hogan and a 20-year-old amateur from Ohio, Jack Nicklaus. It was Palmer’s only victory in the Open but he would finish second four times, three times in playoffs. Finally, there is Nicklaus, who was Jones and


Hogan’s equal in dominating the Open. He beat Palmer in 1962 in a playoff at Oakmont and went on to win a total of four Opens. His combination of power, finesse and course management made


RANK 1 2 3 4 5


FEDEXCUP STANDINGS PLAYER


Luke Donald Bubba Watson Mark Wilson Matt Kutchar Phil Mickleson


POINTS 1,455 1,417 1,321 1,306 1,261


www.pgatour.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228