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June 7-10


IF YOU WANTED TO DESIGN a model for a successful tournament on the Champions Tour, you could do far worse than copying the Regions Tradition, which debuted in 1989. First, you could be identified as a major championship. Second, have the event played on beautiful courses beginning with the Golf Club at Desert Mountain in Arizona, where it was played for the first 12 years, followed by Superstition Mountain Golf and Country Club, also in Arizona (2002), the Reserve Vineyards and Golf Club in Oregon (2003-2006), The Crosswater Club at Sunriver Resort, also in Oregon (2007-2010) and finally, Shoal Creek in Alabama, where it moved last year. Third, get lucky enough to have some World


Golf Hall of Fame-quality winners such as Jack Nicklaus, who won four of the first eight tournaments, as well as Lee Trevino (1992), Raymond Floyd (1994), Tom Kite (2000) and Tom Watson (2003). You can now add to that


impressive list of champions the name of former British Open winner and Ryder Cup captain Tom Lehman. He won last year by beating Peter Senior with a par on the second hole of their playoff when the Australian missed a five- foot par putt on the home hole while Lehman two-putted from 20 feet.


“I didn’t putt well all week,” said


Lehman, whose victory was the third of the season, his second Champions Tour major and his fifth win since turning 50. “I wasn’t


Regions Tradition


Tom Lehman toughed it out to win in a playoff at Shoal Creek.


2


Tom Lehman has won two major


Tour and he won them both in


playoffs. In 2010, Lehman won


the Senior PGA Championship at Colorado Golf


Club near Denver, defeating both


Fred Couples and David Frost.


sure I was ever going to make a putt to win. I just haven’t made anything of any length. It’s unfortunate to win when somebody misses. I wish I could have made a birdie because that would have been more fitting.” Senior had his chance on the first


championships on the Champions


playoff hole but missed a putt for the win. The 17th hole proved to be a


turning point in the final round. Lehman drove into the woods but was able to scramble for a par, while Senior birdied the hole to get into a tie for the lead. By his own admission, Lehman


pretty much gutted out his victory. “I made four bogeys for the week and only 17 birdies,” he said. “That’s not enough birdies, you wouldn’t think. I think I played really smart. I just kind


of kept the ball in play, moving it forward. I hit a lot of greens and had a lot of stress-free pars.” ■


CHARLES SCHWAB CUP STANDINGS PLAYER


Tom Lehman Nick Price


Michael Allen John Cook


Russ Cochran Peter Senior Jeff Sluman Olin Browne


Mark Calcavecchia Loren Roberts


www.pgatour.com


EVENTS 7


8 7 7 7 6 8 7 7 7


POINTS 1,432


698 580 560 493 472 408 330 332 316


-


734 852 872 939 960


1,024 1,102 1,110 1,116


1 -


2 - - - - - -


5 5 5 2 5 3 4 5 4 1


Shoal Creek


(Par 72/7,145 yards) Birmingham, Alabama


Course Insight Shoal Creek


In 1974, Birmingham businessman Hall Thompson asked Jack Nicklaus to take a look at a piece of property that might make a good golf course. Nicklaus toured the property and the more he saw, the better he liked it—so much, in fact, he told Thompson that he could build two courses on the site. Thompson said, in effect, thanks but no thanks. “We only want one golf course,” Thompson said. “But we want to make it a superior one.” And that’s just what he did. In fact, Shoal


Creek was so good that it hosted the 1984 PGA Championship, won by Lee Trevino. The club also hosted the 1986 U.S. Amateur, won by Buddy Alexander, and the 1990 PGA Championship, won by Wayne Grady.


POINTS BEHIND WINS TOP 10 3


“I WISH I COULD HAVE MADE A BIRDIE BECAUSE THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN MORE FITTING.” – Tom Lehman


Tournament Record 265, Doug Tewell, 2001


Tournament 18-Hole Record 62, Doug Tewell, 2001; Tom Watson, 2003; Brad Bryant, 2009


www.regionstradition.com GOLF CHANNEL


Ticket Information PGA TOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE 2012 123


© PGA TOUR/ STAN BADZ


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