This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Photography and words: DIEDERICK ENGELBRECHT


The Western world is a bureaucratic environment. Constantly asked to provide our personal information, we are not known for who we are, but rather by our statistics and paper trail. In particular, our socioeconomic status, or class, is an important aspect of our existence in this bureaucratic world. We are all judged or


WHAT IS SOCIAL CLASS?


labelled depending on our job, how we look, where we are from, the money we have, our education, the clothes we wear and even our hair styles. This is a direct influence of what society has deemed suitable, and we have been conditioned to believe that this is right.We all know what the difference is between rich and poor, but


do we know what socioeconomic class means? Are we even aware of what socioeconomic class we belong to? The official rankings actually shows that even if you’re rich, you don’t necessarily belong to the upper class. You might actually belong to the middle, or even the lower class because of your heritage, education or your


health. There is a fabricated or perceived social class, based on individual people’s perceptions and interpretations, and there is a real socioeconomic class. These two often don’t match, as many people seem to have made their own interpretation, and see themselves in a different light from where they actually belong in the bureaucracy


SOCIAL CLASS DESCRIPTION


A B


C1 C2 D E


30


Higher managerial, administrative or professional Intermediate managerial, administrative or professional Supervisory, clerical and jr. managerial, administrative or professional Skilled manual workers


Semi and unskilled manual workers State pensioners, casual or lowest grade workers, unemployed


% POPULATION (UK) 4


23 29 21 15 8


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