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TEMPTING TREATS Some of the products on offer at the Pet Kingdom in Harrods. The price of a single cupcake starts at £4.95.


such places in London alone. Grooming is not expensive; Glam Dogs in Holloway, North London, for instance, charges an average price of £35 for a full groom - which includes two baths, brushing, pads clear, feet tided, sanitary clip, ears cleaned and nails trimmed, as well as a free consultation and health check. Even the more unusual treatments, such as vegan colour sprays, are available for a few pounds.


However, for the highest income earners the premium place to go is Harrods. This exclusive department store offers 42 treatments at its luxury Pet Spa. Booking with a


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Head or Senior stylist justifies the paw curling price tag of £125 and £85 for a full groom. According to the Spa’s manager, Stephanie Mehanna, Harrods boasts the best pet stylists in London and many local residents book their pets in every week. After all, this is Knightsbridge, where the housing crisis has caused less concern for residents than an out of date organic yoghurt.


Any women would be envious of the treatments available. Dogs can enjoy such sumptuous therapies as an aromatherapy bath and full body massage, thalassotherapy mud bath, blueberry and


vanilla facial, deluxe pedicure, and even a shimmer spray. The Spa also offers a complete programme of mind and body balance treatments. Mehanna says: “It is important not to forget that your pet also needs time to unwind psychologically - something pet owners overlook.” For only £175 an animal Reiki therapist can raise a dog’s life force energy and for a mere £495 a canine behavioural counsellor will attend to its issues in the comfort of your own home.


This obsession with the aesthetic perfection of pets, must beg the question - who is it really for? The answer is


probably best illustrated by the Harrods Pet Spa, where treatments are performed behind a large glass screen and crowds of gawping tourists surround it, amazed by what people will pay to pamper their pets. The dog has become a luxury item, an object of art, a status symbol and visible way for the super-rich to show off their personal wealth. That glass screen creates a visible barrier separating us from them- those who can afford it and the rest who can’t. As this phenomenon spreads onto our streets and dogs are seen better dressed and cared for than most people, perhaps priorities will be forced to shift. Either that or a pooch power revolution is on its way


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