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VANITY FUR Photography and words: ELIZABETH WAIGHT


PAWDICURES AND JET SET LIVING - AN INVESTIGATION OF THE COUNTRY’S NEWEST TOP DOGS.


Americans now spend $41 billion a year on their pets - more than the gross domestic product of all but 64 countries in the world. In case any further proof was needed that the pampering of pets has now gone to extreme lengths, the phenomenon of ‘Neuticles’ - patented testicular implants for dogs that sell for up to $919 a pair - should settle the debate. Pampered pooches can be found sleeping in a Louis XV Pet Pavilion, eating from a Versace Barocco Bowl, being attended by a Danny (dog nanny), experimenting in Doga (doggie yoga), regularly attending a dog spa and even accompanying its owners on holiday - via private jet. The dog is also likely to own a wardrobe containing clothes


more expensive than your average leisure-wear. New York has its own pet fashion week.


This new trend is now spreading across the pond. Although the UK is in the grip of recession, the top percentage of income earners are extending their high-end lifestyles toward their prized pooches. A bewildering array of luxury items is available for the haute hound. A shop assistant at Holly & Lil Pet Boutique, in London Bridge, didn’t blink an eye as she sold £1,000 worth of Swarovsky crystal encrusted collars to the owner of two immaculate, ribbon wearing Yorkies. Dog boutique owner, Louise Harris, spent £1,200 on dog outfits for the wedding of her pet terrier,


Lola. The total cost of the wedding: £20,000.


The fashion industry has been quick to see the potential in its new clients. Vivienne Westwood’s dog clothing line debuted with her £2,500 couture spring jacket, made from white diamonds and small sapphires. In a truly barking mad case, the Amour Amour collar from I Love Diamond Dogs has 1,600 hundred diamonds, a seven carat diamond centerpiece and has been dubbed the “Bugatti of dog collars” by Forbes magazine. The price - £2 million.


Doggie grooming parlours have long been ubiquitous on the high street; Yell lists 140


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