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BARBICAN LIFE


David Mason


Barbican resident organiser of free group organisation website


reading these words and thinking how true. It’s often those with hectic work schedules and weekends crammed full of different activities that end up organising the rest of us!


H


minutes of TRX work (suspension training using straps and your own body weight - developed in the US Navy in the ‘90’s and now used worldwide by sports people of all levels). As a youngster David competed at


county level as a swimmer, narrowly missing out on joining Team GB in the 1970’s. He then started running marathons and once he’d mastered those Iron Man Triathlons beckoned (swim 2.4 miles, cycle 112 miles then run 26.2 miles). He’s currently preparing for the 2013 Iron Man Wales event. For the last twenty years David has been in the Metropolitan Police and is a Physical Training Instructor


(PTI) for their Territorial Support Group and in his spare


Trying to organise different groups people can be a huge headache and you often find that people communicate via different means – phone, email, Facebook and Twitter and even snail mail. Add to this that organising often involves inviting people to meet, looking to see who has responded, reminders,


sending at least a few finding a venue, collecting


subscriptions/ selling tickets and much more. Never before, has a seemingly simple task become such a hassle and taken the enjoyment out of getting together. Now,


set up by a team including


Barbican resident, Satu Pitkanen, there's a solution.


clubs, groups and Eventility.com is a free


organisation and promotion website that allows anyone to create, manage and promote events,


communities. It makes it simple to organise and share news and events with people belonging to the same group, removing the administrative pain and injecting the fun back into your shared interest. Eventility offers an easy to use professional web interface,RSVP and reminder emails, SMS reminders,


subscription payments, the


ability to sell tickets and run offers, integration with Facebook and Twitter, online and phone support and lots more. It also enables people to find out what’s happening locally while helping them to get involved and build networks around their interests. The site already has thousands of clubs


The Bicycle Man


time he volunteers at the Central YMCA as a trainer. David is a trained sports massage


therapist and can treat you at home. Stephanie asked him to look at a long-term lower back injury and found his knowledge and technique to be excellent. (He has a very neat portable couch!) To find out more about David and book


personal training and/or massage visit his website at www.david-mason-barbican- london.co.uk or call him on 07889 070128 or


email: london.co.uk 34 info@david-mason-barbican-


and private and public events, ranging from NCT groups to sports clubs, children’s birthday parties to charity races. As well as groups, clubs and communities, the site is aimed atlocal venues and businesses aiming to offer local deals and help increase their footfall and revenue. Businesses pay a small monthly charge for the service, and in addition to all the website features, they get better web search results and access and free advertising to Eventility users – thousands of prospective customers. To see how Eventility.com can help the


organisation and promotion ofyour club, group, community, event or venue visit www.eventility.com.


ave you ever heard the saying, “if you want a job done well, get a busy person to do it?" You may be


BUSINESS ROUNDUP


I


The Bicycle Man brings Dutch cycling style to the Barbican


n Holland the cycling culture results in a fiercely competitive marketplace where value for money and quality


count. The Bicycle Man, 61-67 Old Street, is a


new local business with an outstanding selection of men’s and ladies’ cycles – from racers to classic styles - mainly from Holland, but also hand-made models from Germany and Belgium. The emphasis is on quality, comfort and low maintenance - gears, dynamos and chains are covered and latest technology replaces some metal chains with carbon belts. Dutch owner Anwar Marzak cycles a bike. This


Vanmoof three year old


Amsterdam company has won design awards for their sturdy, modern, oversized aluminium frames. Lights are built into the frame powered by a hub dynamo. For the real cycle aficionados Anwar stocks the hand-built eleven speed Primarius. Also, Schindelhauers, which have a plastic covered carbon drive belt instead of a chain. This means no more greasy fingers and as there is no slack in the belt all movement translates into speed. The Gazelle Miss Grace is the top selling


ladies bike in Holland right now. It has a classic style aluminium frame, covered chain and puncture resistant tyres. I took one out for a ride – the leather seat and handle bar covering are so comfortable that you won’t want to get off! Electric bikes make up 30% of cycle sales in mainland Europe and this figure is increasing. Battery power supplements pedal power for sppeds up to 25km/hr and battery charge lasts between 50-400kms. Anwar stocks models by Gazelle and Urban Factor. If you want a single speed bike and wish to choose the colour, look at the British designed Foffa bikes. For £545 you can design your bike with Anwar on his IPad and it’ll be ready in about seven days. Accessories for sale include helmets by


Nutcase and Bern; also weatherproof bags by a local London designer. The shop, a corner unit, is small but


stylishly simple and the basement holds a service workshop – for any bike. The Bicycle Man 61-67 Old Street,


London EC1V 9HW Tel: 0207 253 7322 Website: www.thebicycleman.co.uk opening hours: Mon-Fri 10am-7pm Sat noon-5pm


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