This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE VILLAGE TOUR continued from page 7


PHOTOSTORY - ABOVE: Pretty cottages mark the beginning of Mill Lane, which would have once been a hive of activity when the old mill was working at the height of its production of wheat and barley corn. OPPOSITE RIGHT: Apretty picture of theWhite Hart, Flitton, and the church dedicated to St John the Baptist. photos: copyright Alan Humphreys 2012


Local legend has it that the ghostly


figure of a horse-drawn cart and two delivery men can be seen, or heard, travelling along the lane. And when the spring rains flood the stream, the millpond returns and it is said that the mill wheel can be heard grinding corn. Between them, Flitton and


Greenfield once had four public houses: the Compasses in Greenfield; and, in Flitton, the White Hart and the Jolly Coopers still prosper, but the White Horse is now a private house. A post office, the village store (formerly Cockroft’s), and the old village school are also now private houses. Flitton hit the headlines of the local


newspapers in 1939. It was in the early hours on the morning of Friday, 21 April that George Stapleton, a 66-year- old farm labourer, left for work at near- by Ruxox Farm. Later that day, having collected his week’s wages, he headed back towards the White Hart, where he


8 County Life


was lodging. Walking across a field, keeping close to the hedgerows, he was attacked frombehind and repeatedly hit with a wooden gatepost. A blow to the back of his head proved fatal. Local police conducted initial enquiries from theWhite Hart but were unable to gath- er sufficient witness evidence to appre- hend the perpetrator of the crime. But a bundle of old clothing found at the scene of Stapleton’s murder led to the conclusion that a tramp lay in wait for the farmlabourer, knowing he would be carrying his wages. These days, theWhite Hart’s popu-


larity is very much as a venue renowned for its hospitality and fine food. Situated in a particularly pretty part of Flitton, parts of the building can be dated to the early to mid-eighteenth century, and it boasts some original oak timber frames. The property once formed part of the Wrest Park Estate, owned by the Earls and Countesses De


continued on page 10 www.countylifemagazines.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68