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LONDON 2012


Middle East by readers of Business Destinations magazine.


The most visible manifestation of their new Biggin Hill presence is the imposing terminal building, from whose upper stories one can look right across to the City of London. It is so configured that a passenger can indeed sweep up to the front door, walk a few paces through the building to their aircraft and do the same on their return, via a private customs and passport control area. But the interior is designed in such a way as to make any passenger who has the


time to spare feel as if they have stepped into the most luxurious of hotels.


Indeed, the whole point is to provide passengers with a range of comforts from private lounges and bathrooms to a full suite of business tools, including private floors with boardrooms and dedicated offices. With turnkey secure communications, technology and concierge backup, the modern-day company chief can conduct business meetings before departure and on return if required.


Anyone contemplating a trip to London this summer will have to factor in the predicted travel difficulties that an influx of 250,000 people will bring, at main airports, on the roads and public transport. Biggin Hill is perfectly positioned for less stressful trips to the capital. It’s only 6 minutes by helicopter to Central London and 40 minutes by car, avoiding the main arteries that are likely to carry most of the rush. During the Olympics, Rizon Jet’s bases in London and Doha will be co-operating to ensure travel to London is as efficient and trouble-free as possible. London Biggin Hill has slots open and available for booking and a range of visitor services from Concierge, City visitor and accommodation planning to travel companions, and much more besides.


‘It’s the “much more besides” that sets us apart from so many other private jet operators,’ says Allan McGreal, Rizon


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